Spooling down 35mm Cine... Questions?

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by EASmithV, Sep 14, 2012.

  1. EASmithV

    EASmithV Member

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    So, i'm thinking about getting a 400 foot roll of film stock, and cutting it down to 50 foot rolls. Problem is, I read somewhere that 35mm cine had different sprockets than 35mm still film. Will 35mm cine still run correctly through a modern film transport? (I need it to run through my Nikon F6).

    Also, how would you cut the length in 50 foot segments appropriately? Would you use a Caliper and measure the diameter of a 50 foot roll, and roll up the film until it matched the size?

    Wait, does E100D have a rem jet backing? that would make this come to a screeching halt...

    Also, is it true that E100D is the same as E100VS?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 14, 2012
  2. SkipA

    SkipA Member

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    Why 50 foot rolls? Does F6 have a bulk film magazine accessory? If you just want to cut it down for bulk loading into reloadable cassettes, 100 foot rolls should do the trick.

    Most cine film has Bell and Howell perforations. The ones that don't have Kodak Standard perfs, the same as 135 still film. But it shouldn't matter. The B&H perfs are shaped differently and are a little shorter in one dimension, but I've never heard of any 35mm still film camera that had a problem with them.

    I'm not sure how you'd measure 50 feet. The caliper method sounds reasonable.
     
  3. nickrapak

    nickrapak Member

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    E100D does not have remjet backing. It does have a water-soluble anti-halation coating that may discolor the first developer, but it shouldn't affect the potency of the chemistry.
     
  4. SkipA

    SkipA Member

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    I don't know, but I don't think so. However, the last Q&A in this Kodak FAQ on 100D says that E100D was "... built off of the very successful Ektachrome professional and consumer still reversal film line."

    E100D is very contrasty and super saturated.
     
  5. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    I use a piece of board and two bolts. The 400 ft roll would go on one bolt and an empty spool on the other. You can even rig up a crank to speed things up. I use a short length of wood cut to the right diameter to periodicly test the takeup roll.
     
  6. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

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    I spool the large rolls by hand on a table in the dark. I save a spool center from an old roll. I attach the film to the spool center and roll it up by hand. I don't measure exactly. I just keep spinning until the spool is a little smaller than needed to fit in the bulk loader. If you get one of the bulk loaders that takes 200 foot rolls it is a little easier.
     
  7. SkipA

    SkipA Member

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    I have never spooled down large bulk cine rolls to 100 foot size, but I suspect I will do so one day. I have a set of movie reel rewinds, so I'd try this:

    Get a set of movie reel rewind cranks (ebay) and mount them on a board. Cut a circle of cardboard to the desired diameter (to fit your bulk loader) and put it on the takeup side spindle. This will be your capacity guide. Follow it with the empty bulk film spool core. It needs to fit tightly enough on the spindle to prevent slipping. If bulk rolls use a standard 35mm core, it should fit, otherwise adapt it to fit. Turn off the lights in the darkroom, put the long bulk roll on the supply side spindle (it doesn't need to fit tight), tape the end to the empty spool, and crank until you reach the diameter of your cardboard guide. The cardboard guide may also help to keep the bulk roll wound on perfectly flat. You can use your finger on the outside edge of the film as you are filling the core to keep it flat against the guide.
     
  8. Newt_on_Swings

    Newt_on_Swings Member

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    Ive done a fair amount of this, the safest but also the most time consuming way was on a table with a large changing bag in the dark. With clean cotton gloves roll the film until it can fit into a 100ft can or into a bulk loader. this method minimizes a dropped roll, and the potential mess that could be and the time it takes to pick up a large roll of film.

    I have also got a set of neumade rewinds I thought of putting together after some modification (got the 16mm instead of 35mm, but for free) to make it faster but it didnt work out. that would be the fastest. BUT be 100% sure your darkroom is light tight.