spotting?

Discussion in 'Enlarging' started by lewis, Jan 27, 2005.

  1. lewis

    lewis Member

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    Does spotting work on resin coated (multigrade iv) prints ?
    The reason I ask is I'm trying to print a shot of shadows falling on a fairly dark wall. In placees the surface of the wall has chipped off revealing white chalky patches - which look like large spots on the print.
    Any suggestions ? Is it possble to burn such localised small areas ?

    Any ideas gratefully rec'd
     
  2. jovo

    jovo Membership Council

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    Yes, spotting works on RC paper. At least the Spotone fluid does. As for the chipped parts being burned in....just clone em out in photochop....KIDDING....please don't hurt me...please!!
     
  3. Neal

    Neal Subscriber

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    Dear Lewis,

    I often create dodging/burning masks by scanning a test print and priniting it out about half size. Some 3-M spray cement mounts it to black construction paper (you could use an ink-jet on heavy paper, I just use my laser printer) and then I cut out the areas I want to burn. I use a piece of paper below the mask as a "shutter" and a watch that beeps once a second to control the exposure. You would be amazed at how quick and easy it is to make some really complicated masks this way.

    Neal Wydra
     
  4. rogueish

    rogueish Member

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    You can burn in small spots but it takes practice. If it's real small then it may not be possible. Spotting RC paper can be frustrating (to me anyway) as the spotone doesn't sink in and dry quicly. Be carefull when touching the ink with the paper towel as you may cause it to streak. Blot, don't wipe.
    My 2 biggest problems are the spotone was not diluted enough and went on too dark on the first go, or I goofed up and didn't blend (for lack of a better word) enough and touch up was more noticable than the original spots. Oh and I sometimes suffer from coffee shakes too which is not good for fine touch ups.
     
  5. blansky

    blansky Subscriber

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    Any one who is doing retouching or spotting I'd suggest Veronica Cass dyes.
    www.veronicacass.com.

    You can buy a 4 oz bottle for about $5.00 and it will last forever. I use mauve on both negatives and prints. Or you can buy midnight. I use warmtone for sepia/selenium prints.

    I'm amazed at the number of people that will rather do anything other than spot or retouch a print or negative. It is a very easy procedure and if you would like some help learning please feel free to personal mail me.

    Michael
     
  6. Konical

    Konical Subscriber

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    Good Afternoon, Neal,

    Thanks for a great idea! Here I have a scanner and a laser printer and could have been turning out custom-made dodging tools for years; all I lacked (as usual) was the necessary imagination.

    Konical
     
  7. Lee Shively

    Lee Shively Member

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    Spotting RC paper is usually easier for me than spotting fiber. Spotone isn't absorbed as fast so you can dab it off quickly if you use too much. Don't use hardener in your fixer for best results.
     
  8. geraldatwork

    geraldatwork Member

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    I find spotting very easy on fiber paper and even knowing where the spots are people can't see the "cover up". I use the Spotone Dyes. I however have had little success with RC paper. You can spot it (the dyes) a mile away. I've had some success on RC paper using a very soft pencil lightly applied to areas. But only in the lighter tones.
     
  9. Monophoto

    Monophoto Member

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    There is a concensus that RC paper can be spotted, but not whether it is harder or easier than FB paper.

    My experience is that spotting RC paper is no easier or harder than spotting FB paper. Furthermore, I find spotting to be relatively easy to do.

    Several folks have mentioned Spottone. It is my understanding that the company that made Spottone has gone out of business. I know that when I was in Adorama a couple of months ago, they had only one or two bottles of Spottone left. Veronica Cass makes spotting fluids, and the "new kid on the block" is Marshall's.
     
  10. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member

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    Etching the spots right off the neg with a knife is another option, but if you're shooting 35mm it can be difficult (possibly not, if the background is very uniform and the "white" spot very easy to isolate), and might merit doing an enlarged neg.
     
  11. lewis

    lewis Member

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    hmm thanks, I did a couple of prints last night - so I'll have a go with the spotone tonight....only two chances to get it right tho...here's hoping
     
  12. glbeas

    glbeas Member

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    Actually it will wash of if you goof, especially the RC. Rinse and dry as you normally would and try again. A drop of Photo flo in the water you use to dilute the Spotone does wonders to smooth the application.
     
  13. jovo

    jovo Membership Council

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    A hint to matching the color of the surrounding area is to use the edge of a discard print for testing. Apply the dye and you can move the edge nearly on top of the place you are spotting. The brush should not be wet enough to leave a liquid drop of fluid anywhere. A nearly dry brush (I like using a #00) applied in a stippling manner will help make undetectable retouches.
     
  14. JohnFinch

    JohnFinch Member

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    If you can see the spots on your RC papers try steaming the emulsion side gently over a kettle. This softens the emulsion and lets the dyes merge in more effectively. If they are still too apparent I polish the print surface with plain furniture polish. Yep, plain furniture polish! This only works with gloss or pearl print finishes. I got the idea from my father who has many old old prints that were polished as above and show no detrimental effects at all.
     
  15. Ronald Moravec

    Ronald Moravec Member

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    Wet the area with water before spotting. Spot and dry. RC and FB behave the same if you do this.