Stabiliser - is it necessary ?

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by alspix, May 3, 2006.

  1. alspix

    alspix Member

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    I've been using a Nova Pro-Speed C41 kit press kit, no stabiliser.

    I can't find a clear statement on whether a stabilizer is required on modern films. I haven't stabilised the negs I've processed so far, but I gather this can still be done some time after development.

    So is it really necessary, and if so where in the UK can I get stabiliser? I would be prepared to mix my own, but equally where do you buy raw chemicals like formaldehyde in small quantities, I really have no idea where to start!

    Any ideas?

    cheers,

    al
     
  2. Alessandro Serrao

    Alessandro Serrao Member

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    Yes' it's paramount to preserve colour integrity.
    You can mix our own by making a 2% formalin solution.
     
  3. alspix

    alspix Member

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    OK, thanks. So anyone know where in the UK to buy this sort of stuff?
     
  4. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Older films need a stabilzer made of formalin and photo flo, but modern films need a 'final rinse' with proprietary chemistry that still stabilizes the film but also containes photo flo.

    These are both available from Kodak and Fuji. Several other companies sell the earlier formalin based stabilzer.

    Information on this is available on the Kodak and Fuji web sites.

    PE
     
  5. nworth

    nworth Subscriber

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    The simple answer is yes. It doesn't matter whether it is the traditional stabilizer or the proprietary final rinse (use whichever the manufacturer recommends), you need a post-wash treatment for archival permanence. Without it, the negatives or transparencies will start to deteriorate in a few months or a couple of years, depending on storage conditions and the particular film.
     
  6. chorleyjeff

    chorleyjeff Member

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    I have been processing C41 films and now find I should have used stabiliser.
    Is this stuff the same as stabilisor for RA4 prints - that's the chemical that is supposed to brighten prints by 10% ?
    Thanks

    Jeff
     
  7. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    The RA4 print stabilzer is not the same as the film stabilzer.

    PE
     
  8. alspix

    alspix Member

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    I think I saw somewhere that the RA4 stuff is not for use on film.

    So what we need is formalin. I understand this is the same stuff used as a biocide to treat ponds, so can I just walk into the local pond supplier and buy any brand of formalin product? are they all the same, i.e. a 36% formaldehyde solution?

    Would this be OK for instance?

    http://petsparade.com/koi-pond/disease-water-treatments/?p=262
     
  9. Fotohuis

    Fotohuis Member

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    You can buy it (here) in the pharmacy, normally 37%.

    To get a C41 stabilizer 1% is sufficient together with the regular used wetting agent.

    To make 1 Ltr. stabilizer use 27ml 37% formaline and 2-5 ml wetting agent (depending on brand and concentration for using in 1 Ltr.).

    Formaldehyde is very toxid, cancer suspiscious a.s.o.
    Wear plastic gloves, eye protection and max. ventilation when doing this. If you have no experiences with handling of (toxid) chemicals I can only recommend not to use it.