Stabilized lenses?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Equipment' started by waynecrider, Jun 14, 2014.

  1. waynecrider

    waynecrider Member

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    I seem to remember that stabilized lenses came out during the last years of the heyday of film cameras. Can someone confirm that? If so, which bodies did they work with, any brand.
    I ask as I'm thinking I'd like a stabilized lens since I'm just not that steady anymore.
    Addendum: obviously for low lit shots
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 14, 2014
  2. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

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  3. Dan Fromm

    Dan Fromm Member

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    Wayne, have you considered using, e.g., a Ken-Lab gyro stabilizer? Not inexpensive, but they don't limit you to stabilized lens/body combinations.
     
  4. Fotoguy20d

    Fotoguy20d Subscriber

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    Any Canon EOS body should work with their IS lenses. I've used my Élan 7 with the 28-135 and 70-200 IS lenses.

    Dan
     
  5. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

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    Canon's much-trumpeted 75-300 IS f4.5-5.6 tele lens came out in 1995; I purchased it but later regretted it for the huge drain on a CR5 battery (with EOS1N, before I invested in the power drive booster E1), noise and tardiness, to say nothing of really mediocre optical performance. Now, whether the mid-1990s of the first IS/VR lenses can be described as the hey-day of film photography is open to conjecture; I would say it was much earlier than that — throught the 1980s to early-1990s. Modern era IS lenses have been much better designed but still command a lot of power and generally I view IS/VR as more of a gimmick. And optically, these IS/VR lenses have improved very dramatically — especially Canon's 70-200 f2.8 IS, but given my refined technique and experience I have never regretted my non-IS version of that lens.