Storing negatives

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by zackesch, Nov 11, 2012.

  1. zackesch

    zackesch Member

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    Earlier tonight, I developed my first roll of film earlier tonight "Success! :D ", and I was wondering, since I do not have sleeves to store my neg's in just yet, what is a good way to store them till i get a pack.
     
  2. Stephanie Brim

    Stephanie Brim Member

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    I cut into strips and stored in plain white envelopes. I don't know that I'd recommend that, though, as it's easy to scratch the film. Once I wised up that they would do it with scanning, I'd take them in to the local lab to have them scanned and sleeved.
     
  3. hoffy

    hoffy Member

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    I have the same dilemma tonight! I processed my first 4x5's today. For the moment I have put them in separate (new) sandwich zip lock bags until I get some sleeves.
     
  4. RedSun

    RedSun Member

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    You can just get a sheet of plain printer paper and fold it along the wide side. Envelope is find if you are sure that moisture is not a problem. You do not want the glue to get on the film.
     
  5. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

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    Any of these solutions will work for the short-term (which is actually a rather long time). Just make sure that evertyhing is dry first, and they are not stored compressed under pressure or in an environment where humidity may get high.
     
  6. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    Yes, make sure they are COMPLETELY dry. Feeling dry to touch isn't dry enough. Otherwise, any attempt to put it in sleeves or envelope will end up marking the delicate emulsion surface.

    If you already have sleeves on order, you can just leave it in dry and dust free environment. It won't hurt anything. I've done that for a week or more for one reason or another with mine. You can also let it roll back into a losely wound roll, then put it in a zip loc bag. I've done that too.
     
  7. bvy

    bvy Subscriber

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    Curiously, what do people think is a sufficient drying time for film? At least 24 hours? Longer?
     
  8. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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  9. wogster

    wogster Member

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    Go to the dollar store and pick up a roll of parchment paper, cut into pieces about 3 times the width of your film and two frames wider then your film, put the film at one side and fold the top over, now fold the ends in, and fold it over again. Crease the paper so that it stays in place. Put in a cool, dark, dry place and your film can safely stay in there for more then your lifetime and be fine. If you need to label then use one of those markers intended for CD's which are acid free.
     
  10. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    I usually let my film dry overnight before handling them.