Straps...

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Equipment' started by tiktianc, May 25, 2014.

  1. tiktianc

    tiktianc Member

    Messages:
    16
    Joined:
    May 7, 2014
    Location:
    Bristol, UK
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I've acquired and used a small but fairly wide range of film cameras over the last (almost) 2 years, and in that time also used a whole bunch of random straps and things that came with the various camera's, either originally or added by it's previous user. I've personally found that for original camera straps I like the AF Film body pentax straps (the ones with the little pockets on them) and Mamiya AFD straps the most, the Mamiya one a little bit more, as it is just the perfect length, the webbing is really supple but also feels strong and the grippy stuff is pretty good, are the best ones.
    Outside of camera manufacturer ones I've only used an optech one which I quite like as well, but it's a bit thick which is both a good thing (padding and comfort) and a bad thing (I can't keep it under my bag strap to stop it sliding off as I move it to my eye to shoot), and this one I made myself out of tubular webbing and some industrial hook clip things and bits (which might have been quite good but could use a couple more revisions).

    I find straps to be a pretty big factor in the usability of my cameras (I know some people shoot without straps, but I personally couldn't get used to it (also I have some large camera's which are a tad tiring to be holding all day long :smile: )), what do you guys think?
     
  2. AgX

    AgX Member

    Messages:
    12,371
    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2007
    Location:
    Germany
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Waist belt bag.
     
  3. jp498

    jp498 Member

    Messages:
    1,463
    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2009
    Location:
    Owls Head ME
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The optech neoprene straps are good, but a little too bouncy sometimes.

    I like the black suede Tamrac strap. I use them on my DSLRs. Classy and they don't slide down off your shoulder. The suede grips well against cotton shirts or nylon jackets.
     
  4. hoffy

    hoffy Member

    Messages:
    2,352
    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2009
    Location:
    Adelaide, Au
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Optech all the way for me. I find them the most comfortable with heavier cameras. I also find that the neoprene not too bouncy, unlike an INCA strap I had bought many years ago
     
  5. StoneNYC

    StoneNYC Subscriber

    Messages:
    8,160
    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2012
    Location:
    Connecticut,
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    Canon CPS (Canon Professional Services) give out Canon branded optec neoprene straps... They are great for heavy cameras and terrible for light cameras...

    I'm also missing one strap that is very much needed which is a Mamiya44LM which uses some kind of round attachment, similar to the MamiyaRZ67 strap but round instead if square, they seem to be hard to come by as original and the camera is too light for the neoprene version (which I believe is the only other kind that has that odd attachment).

    I agree, the strap issue is pretty important and a frustrating one when you can't get the one you need/want/feel comfortable with...
     
  6. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

    Messages:
    6,926
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2007
    Location:
    Richmond VA.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I like my Optech also.

    Jeff
     
  7. benjiboy

    benjiboy Subscriber

    Messages:
    8,702
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2005
    Location:
    U.K.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I have a couple of Op-tech straps but my favorites are my Domke Gripper straps but for my New F1 body that has the AE Motor Drive FN (which takes 12 A.A. batteries) attached is too heavy especially with a 300mm lens attached to hang round anyones neck, I use a wrist strap.
     
  8. Peltigera

    Peltigera Member

    Messages:
    715
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2012
    Location:
    Lincoln, UK
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I bought some very cheap straps from a firm in China on the basis that I needed several straps and I was broke. I expected them to be awful but they are excellent - well made and comfortable.
     
  9. John_Nikon_F

    John_Nikon_F Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,951
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2008
    Location:
    Duvall, WA,
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I used to be an OP/TECH fan, until I had one break on me in 2005. Switched to the Domke Grippers later that year. Use them on all of my cameras.

    -J
     
  10. Bob Marvin

    Bob Marvin Member

    Messages:
    115
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2002
    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I too like Domke Gripper straps best, although I use an OpTech strap for my VERY heavy MF SLR.
     
  11. benjiboy

    benjiboy Subscriber

    Messages:
    8,702
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2005
    Location:
    U.K.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Just to digress for a moment, Iv'e never understood why any camera straps need quick releases because on the Op Tech ones unless you need buy these http://www.amazon.co.uk/TECH-Secure...=UTF8&qid=1401234516&sr=1-11&keywords=op+tech it's very easy if you grasp the strap in the wrong place to bounce your camera on the deck, at lease with the domke Gripper Strap the connectors are spring loaded and it can't be done by accident.
     
  12. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

    Messages:
    4,329
    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2008
    Location:
    Geelong/Richmond Vic AU
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Yes the buckle can be accidently released. Noy restricted to camera straps either. No big sweat to use a Velcro tab to secure the QR buckle on some OpTech straps. The one I use for the Pentax 67 is nowt more than a short haul-up strap that quickly converts to the well-known fat neoprene neck strap as and when needed.

    Sent from my GT-I9210T using Tapatalk
     
  13. AgX

    AgX Member

    Messages:
    12,371
    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2007
    Location:
    Germany
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I'm puzzled. I never had such buckle release unintentionally.

    EDIT: I see. I don't have such buckles at places were one typically grasps to hold the strap.
     
  14. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

    Messages:
    4,329
    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2008
    Location:
    Geelong/Richmond Vic AU
    Shooter:
    Multi Format


    Pic of haul-up strap with velcro band through buckle to prevent accidental release when picking up — probably exactly what you found. This buckle is at the exact apex where the hand and fingers are when picking the camera up, so it really did require additional security. Never had an accident with it like this.

    DSCN2253_1347.JPG

    This very short strap — as I call it, a 'haul-up' for the big Pentax 67, is nowhere near the nuisance that a normal camera strap is e.g. flaying around in the wind, potentially tangling with the tripod during dismounting, arms getting caught in it... it's 50-50 photographers around the world will have their own preference and unique needs. Strictly speaking, straps detract from the useability of cameras in professional use because they are a potential liability for an accident or slowing things down during a shoot. Straps are all the rage for the latest and greatest digital cameras but do nothing at all for the large cameras (MF, LF) that are so much of the analogue world.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 27, 2014
  15. Vilk

    Vilk Member

    Messages:
    443
    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2008
    Location:
    hegeso.com
    Shooter:
    35mm
    +1 for the narrow, swivelless donkey; +10 for the best thing nikon ever produced: the AN-4B :laugh:
     
  16. miha

    miha Member

    Messages:
    1,250
    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2007
    Location:
    Slovenia
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Good point. I prefer a wrist strap to a standard neck strap, particularly if it is padded and made of leather. It allows carrying the camera at arm's length.
     
  17. benjiboy

    benjiboy Subscriber

    Messages:
    8,702
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2005
    Location:
    U.K.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    As I wrote, it's completely beyond my understanding why a camera neck strap should need a quick release.
     
  18. jp498

    jp498 Member

    Messages:
    1,463
    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2009
    Location:
    Owls Head ME
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    It would indeed have to be pretty obscure and would probably never be used.



    I have a strap on my 300/2.8 and sometimes it gets tangled with the strap on my camera, and a quick release might be handy but unnecessary for untangling that.

    Moving a camera in and out of an underwater housing might require quick removal of a strap.

    If you are working at height, you might want to loop your camera strap through a ring on your harness, but carabiners are made for that. I've looped my camera strap around a radio tower leg once, using the quick release, set the self timer, and climbed down under its' wide angle lens for a cool self portrait. Most people wouldn't be doing that sort of thing. I've also looped the strap through my shoulder belt while flying in an open cockpit biplane.
     
  19. benjiboy

    benjiboy Subscriber

    Messages:
    8,702
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2005
    Location:
    U.K.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Weighing up the fact "it will probably never be used" against bouncing your camera on the deck which is much more likely, who needs them ?.
     
  20. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

    Messages:
    17,194
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2005
    Location:
    Delta, BC, Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    For quick removal, and for switching between thin straps and thick straps, as well as between wrist straps, neck straps and chest harnesses.

    With my cameras which feature interchangeable finders, I sometimes use a long strap for the eye level finders and a short strap for cameras with a waist level (actually chest level) finders.
     
  21. benjiboy

    benjiboy Subscriber

    Messages:
    8,702
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2005
    Location:
    U.K.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Neither have I but it's an accident waiting to happen, and the first time it happens and bounces one of my Canon F1's on the floor for even the first time will be enough.
     
  22. Stephen Prunier

    Stephen Prunier Subscriber

    Messages:
    176
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2008
    Location:
    Danvers, MA,
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I too use the "haul up strap method" as I usually just use it to help with getting my RZ67 onto the tripod. With my F100 I use that setup 90% of the time without using the tripod. I'm going to look for some Velcro to add like you did. Thanks for the heads up.
     
  23. GarageBoy

    GarageBoy Member

    Messages:
    652
    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2012
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Best strap ever - it's the nicer version of the generic 70s-00s narrow, nylon webbing strap. Stays out of the way and does it job. For some more flash, there's the AN-4Y (usually, a dollar cheaper, too)
     
  24. benjiboy

    benjiboy Subscriber

    Messages:
    8,702
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2005
    Location:
    U.K.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I think you mean Domke., on the other hand you'd get a bigger kick from a donkey.