"Streaks" in Color Printing

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by Kevin Caulfield, Dec 21, 2004.

  1. Kevin Caulfield

    Kevin Caulfield Subscriber

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    I just did one of my few color printing sessions for the year, and I seem to have had more than my fair share of "streaks". You know when you make sure the drum is dry, expose the paper, put it into the drum and process. Then you find that although you finally got the color balance right, and removed the specks of dust, you've managed to get bright red or yellow streaks running across the print (and down the print...or just in random locations on the print). Am I right in thinking that these originate from drops of water remaining in the drum??? Any ideas on how to combat this problem? Thanks.
     
  2. steve

    steve Member

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    It's either water or not enough chemicals in the drum. Water is tough. When I used drum processors, I took both ends off the drum, dried the inside using a lint free paper towel (Kimwipe) and then used a hair dryer to blow out & evaporate the remaining water. Same with the inside of the drum - wipe down & dry with a hair dryer.

    I would do that before making the next exposure so that the drum would cool down to room temperature & not raise the temperature of the chemicals. That's the only way I know of to get the drum really dry.

    Hair dryers are really okay to use in the darkroom - just make sure the one you use has a built-in ground fault interrupter circuit. All of them sold in the US must now have that type of circuit so that if you're dumb enough to attempt to dry your hair while still lounging in the tub & drop the dryer into the tub you won't electrocute yourself. Don't know whether the same requirements apply in Australia - shouldn't be hard to find out.
     
  3. Claire Senft

    Claire Senft Member

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    Are you using a stopbath.

    many times streaking problems can be caused by not using a stopbath.
     
  4. Canuck

    Canuck Member

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    I second that. Many a printing session of mine was ruined without a good stop bath between the developer and blix.
     
  5. Ed Sukach

    Ed Sukach Member

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    Streaking is usually caused by left-over water in the tank (or running through the darkroom naked - but thats another story..).

    I normally work with two JOBO tanks in color print processing. After unloading the first, I'll wipe the inside of the tank with a large wad of run-of-the mill paper towels - and let it air dry until my next print is ready - about five to ten minutes. - a method devised from practical experience.

    It is a good idea to use shortstop between color developer and bleach-fix - I do - invariably.
     
  6. Kevin Caulfield

    Kevin Caulfield Subscriber

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    Thanks all for your comments. Yes, I do use a stop, so as I suspected it looks like it's probably just water doing the streaking. But Ed, it was hot enough in there yesterday for me to do the streaking too. :wink: I usually just use a wad of paper towels, but I leave one end on the drum, so the water probably originates from that end. I may try using a second drum to give each one time to dry. Again, thanks all.
     
  7. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

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    My big source of water is the lid. Water seems to hide in there.
     
  8. Neal

    Neal Subscriber

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    Dear Kevin,

    A suggestion if you don't print color that often: Use Photocolor or Tetenal room temperature chemistry in trays. I find it much easier to work this way than with drums. I set an audible timer for the steps and use medical style latex gloves (nitrile and silicone are available at home centers for those with latex allergies). Working in total darkness really doesn't take that long to get used to.

    One last note, I use a quick water bath between the developer and stop as the RA-4 developer seems to change the color of indicator stop bath before its time.

    Neal Wydra