Street Photography Film + Developing

Discussion in 'Street' started by lft, Feb 10, 2009.

  1. lft

    lft Member

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    So as I'm essentially an amateur at serious photography, I have a few questions about film, development, and time. I'm looking for fine grain street photos with a pretty high contrast and a nice density. I've heard various things about pull processing and push processing Tri-X 400 film, so I'm a little confused. Also, I'm wondering if I should switch from TMax Dev to D-76, as I hear it yields better results. If I do switch to D-76 developer, what are the times for push processing/pull processing. As you can see, I'm very confused...please help.
     
  2. milkplus-mesto

    milkplus-mesto Member

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    I've spent a while using FP4+ and ID-11, it's a little slow, even though I rated it at 200. If you feel like it, you could try HP5+ or Pan 400, or even Kentmere 400 if you're in the USA - Delta 400 isn't too bad, but doesn't have as much of a "classic" look. But for anything Ilford, ID-11 is luvverly.
     
  3. Paul Howell

    Paul Howell Member

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    I'm looking for fine grain street photos with a pretty high contrast and a nice density. I've heard various things about pull processing and push processing Tri-X 400 film, so I'm a little confused.

    Tri X is pretty verstial, it can be pushed to 3200, but can become grainy. Tmax 400 can be pushed to 3200 as well and Tmax 3200 can be pushed to 6400, I think grain is better with Tmax 3200 shot at 1200 to 1600 than Tri X pushed. I only use Tmax developer or DDX with Tmax or Delta, for Tri X, HP 5, or Forma 400 I use Edwal 12, Microdal X 1:3, there are lots of combos each with its own look. If I am after an older 70s look I use Forma 400 and Microdal X. Many Tri X shooter like Xtol or HC 110.

    Also, I'm wondering if I should switch from TMax Dev to D-76, as I hear it yields better results.

    The only way to find out to try both and see what you like best.

    If I do switch to D-76 developer, what are the times for push processing/pull processing.

    Kodak data guide gives times and temps for TriX and D76, as does the massive development chart.
     
  4. Tim Gray

    Tim Gray Member

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    I personally like XTOL. It's pretty nice. With Plus-X, Tri-X, or TMZ, so you can get a wide range of speeds/grain.
     
  5. rduraoc

    rduraoc Member

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    It also depends on where you shoot. I shoot 35mm street photography with FP4+ rated at 100 and developed in Rodinal 1+50, but I live in sunny and bright Lisbon. I then try to compensate the relatively slow film with fast primes and, when possible and needed, fast wide angles.

    This weekend I made some tests with a 50x70cm print from a 35mm neg, and I have to get my nose really close to the paper to see the grain. It's working for me.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 10, 2009
  6. lft

    lft Member

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    ah, thank you, thank you. I'm most likely am going to switch to D-76, but for more contrast do i shoot tri x 400 at 800 or 50/100?
     
  7. lawrenceimpey

    lawrenceimpey Member

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    >>for more contrast do i shoot tri x 400 at 800 or 50/100?

    By now you probably know the answer but if not here it is. You get more contrast by increasing development and less contrast by reducing development i.e. it's the development that controls the contrast, not the film speed. However, to compensate for the increased development (to get the extra contrast) you need to uprate your film to a higher speed (800, for example) otherwise the highlights will be too dense (or 'blown out'). In summary -- increase your film and increase your development to get more contrast. You will, of course, get less shadow detail when you do this and a bit more grain.
     
  8. Simplicius

    Simplicius Member

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    I'm with Rduraoc on this way of thinking, Although not blessed with the climate of Lisbon. I generally try to use 100 ISO or even Ilford PANF 50 and then slap a light or dark yellow filter on. Works great with fast primes, still get a decent shutter speed 250 or 125. I find my favourite shots were taken this way as it forces you to shoot wide open, and everything not applicable is nicely blurred.
     
  9. You're definitely in the right place to have your questions answered. To learn more about film, its behavior, and development, I suggest the Ansel Adams series (The Camera, The Negative, The Print) of photo tech books. You'll get a lot out of them. As to film choice, and my 2 cents added, my vote goes for TRI-X/D-76 combination. For street photography, it's a "classic" look and feel, and very versatile. You might also want to try HC-110 as a developer with TRI-X. This should be a good place to start; learn what these combinations can achieve, and then experiment with others. Oh, and don't forget to have fun! Good luck!

    Andrew Horodysky
     
  10. desi8888

    desi8888 Member

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    ....
     
  11. jp498

    jp498 Member

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    I'd properly develop and expose for normal contrast, and add the contrast when printing. Then you can have the potential for multiple contrasts for different uses. Scanning will work better with normal contrast negatives, at least with an epson. Some scenes you might want a little more shadow or highlight detail later on, which might not be as easy if the negatives are high contrast. Just my personal style. I've mostly used tmy2 and d76 or xtol for random convenient shooting. Tmy2 is more expensive than the various low budget tri-x clones, but it's very consistent quality and less grainy.
     
  12. lensworker

    lensworker Member

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    I would advocate using Tri-X @ ISO 400 for daytime street photography, developed in D-76 1:1. This works very well for me - no issues or complaints.

    If you need more speed than ISO 400, Tri -X pushed to ISO 1600 and developed at ISO 1600 looks really nice - to my eye, at least. Straight work prints at 8"x10" size show nice smooth grain with a bit of a loss in contrast - noticeable but not objectionable. The contrast loss can be addressed in printing.

    If you want finer grain than Tri-X, give Fuji Acros ISO 100 a test drive. Acros is not as forgiving as Tri-X is, though.