T MAX 100 Developing

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by janrzm, Jun 2, 2012.

  1. janrzm

    janrzm Member

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    I've just loaded my first roll of Kodak T MAX 100 in to the camera. I use Ilford chemicals, ID-11, Ilfostop, Rapid Fixer, I've just started to look at developing and fixing times online, I'd really welcome comments from anyone else thats used this combination of film and chemicals.

    Cheers

    Jason
     
  2. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Use the recommendations in the PDF's on Ilfords website. The stop bath and fixer instructions on the bottles are OK as wll. Good luck

    Ian
     
  3. TareqPhoto

    TareqPhoto Member

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    Just go for it, i had that bug before, but once i started i never look back, i lost few rolls because of mistakes [wrong loading, not exposing the roll], but the development was always or mostly spot on, if there is a problem it is mostly me, follow that sheet Ian linked to and give it a try, Ilfostop and fixer are not a big deal, just let us know what you will get.

    Good luck

    Tareq
     
  4. markbarendt

    markbarendt Subscriber

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    Yep, following Ilford's instructions is very reliable and provides great results.
     
  5. brucemuir

    brucemuir Member

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    Establish good consistent habits now and you'll find they will become automatic once you have your processes down.

    TMAX films can build contrast quickly so it's a good idea to be precise with your times and temperature that gives you the negs you want.
     
  6. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    Go for it.

    I'd use the published time for development stage as a starting point. If you have to error, error on shorter side than longer.

    Time for stop and fix aren't critical. 30 seconds stop and 5 minutes fix is sufficient.
     
  7. John Shriver

    John Shriver Member

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    Be sure you have a good thermometer -- the change in contrast with developing time/temperature is steeper with TMAX than any other films.
     
  8. Katie

    Katie Subscriber

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  9. janrzm

    janrzm Member

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    Thanks everyone for the advice and encouragement....
     
  10. RalphLambrecht

    RalphLambrecht Subscriber

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    tha's wthe chemistruy iuse w(ith tmax400),but i use twobath fixing with all tmax films!
     
  11. TareqPhoto

    TareqPhoto Member

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    Ralph, are you drunk? I can't understand what you typed/wrote :blink: :laugh:
     
  12. Newt_on_Swings

    Newt_on_Swings Member

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    I used to do two bath fix on Tmax as well, but I stopped after awhile. Seems like it didnt need it, but what it did need was extra washing to get the dye out.
     
  13. Early Riser

    Early Riser Subscriber

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    The advantage of 2 fixing baths is that often when using a single bath that single bath becomes silver saturated and does not fix properly. Leaving you not knowing at what point that fixer became exhausted and if the film has been fixed sufficiently. So I always use two baths and test the first bath while the film is in the second bath, when I discover it's exhausted, I simply extend the fix time of the second bath by a minute.