T-Max 100 Professional

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by ishutteratthethought, Apr 11, 2008.

  1. ishutteratthethought

    ishutteratthethought Subscriber

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    Hello folks.
    Just wanted to ask what your thoughts are with T-Max 100 Pro film .
    I shot a lot of medium format T-Max 100 in the early 1990's, processed in D-76 and fixed for 10 mins, and the negatives were as crisp as could be. I am now shooting the new T-Max 100 - 4 x 5 sheet film with similar developing processes(shorter developing times) and the negatives are not nearly as robust. I do get good images when printing however the negatives do not seem as crisp. The negs are in sharp focus but just seem lackluster compared to the old 2.5 sq t-max film from the early 1990's I shot through my Hassy.
    I use a couple of different lenses on the 4 x 5. a 150 Schneider and a 210 Sinar, both pristine lenses.
    Any thoughts? is it the film? or is it me? (hope it's not me)
    Thanks
     
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  2. Mahler_one

    Mahler_one Member

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    You might want to do some film testing, and perhaps construct some curves. The curves of the T Max 100 sheet film and the roll film were definitely different when I did testing using DDX. The developing times were different at different subject brightness ranges. In some of Howard Bond's articles he also points out that some films are completely different when the same "brands" in sheet and roll film are compared.

    Ed
     
  3. Kilgallb

    Kilgallb Subscriber

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    The developing times for TMX-100 changed a few years ago due to a change in the anti-halation layer. Maybve you just need to experiment with development time. I have found TMX-100 especially finicky with development times and temperature.
     
  4. ishutteratthethought

    ishutteratthethought Subscriber

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    Thanks guys, I must say that I have always strictly adhered to proper development times & temps and still do. I was aware of the difference between sheet film & roll film but it seems like the 4 x 5 film has the appearance of a total different type of film. Once again, my current prints are good however my prints from the older negs that I print now have a better appearance.
    I will try some more tests especially with some different types of developers. I thought my testing days were days gone by. ....I imagine that I will forver be testing to attain what is acceptable to me.
    I appreciate your thoughts.

    Steve
     
  5. jeroldharter

    jeroldharter Member

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    BTZS film test

    You might try doing a BTZS film test. It costs $45 at the View Camera Store, one of the sponsors here. They send you 5 sheets of TMAX100 (or any other film you might want) pre-exposed to a step tablet. You process each sheet in your system for different times, e.g. 4 min, 5:30, 8:00, 11:00, and 16:00. Send them the processed film and they run it through the densitometer and generate all of the BTZS graphs which they send you. You will receive a wealth of information about your film developer combo which you can use regardless of whether you use the BTZS system.
     
  6. Mahler_one

    Mahler_one Member

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    You beat me to it Jerold....
     
  7. CPorter

    CPorter Member

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    Have you tried using D-76 1:1 with your sheet film to see if there is a difference you can detect? I use the 1:1 dilution with my 4x5 TMX with good results. I have attached the speed test curve and the development time curves for your reference. I use a daylight tank with inversion agitaiton.
     

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  8. ishutteratthethought

    ishutteratthethought Subscriber

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    I do process tmax 100 35mm roll film 1:1 w/D-76 however I do not process the 4 x 5 sheets 1:1 per Kodak's recommendations. I develop using full strength D-76.
    It's funny now that I think back, I have really never used another type of developer over all these years (approx 30). It's crazy, I would almost consider it ignorant although D-76 has given me great results on most films. I believe I've tried Rodenol a time or two but mostly D-76. I will experiment with other developers and different times.
    I did order some 4 x 5 Delta 100 to give that a try. I have heard a lot of positive things about that film. I have been using tmax 100 for many many years now.
    Thanks,
    Steve
     
  9. chriscrawfordphoto

    chriscrawfordphoto Subscriber

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    Steve,

    Tmax 100 changed for the worse a few yrs ago when Kodak built a new factory to coat thier black and white films. It became EXTREMELY grainy and less sharp. I used to use it devloped in Rodinal 1+50, and found it grainier than Plus-X and FP-4 after the change. The old version was nearly grainless in Rodinal. The new version is a little less grainy in D-76 1+1 compared to Rodinal but it is still nowhere near what it used to be. I've switched to FP-4.