T64 Revival?

Discussion in 'Product Availability' started by kristopher_lawrence, Aug 13, 2010.

  1. kristopher_lawrence

    kristopher_lawrence Member

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  2. perkeleellinen

    perkeleellinen Member

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    There's hope for 800Z yet!

    I wonder if T64 was such a slow seller that even now, a year after discontinuance, there's still loads of it in supply chains.
     
  3. E76

    E76 Member

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    Maybe that's what this is? An attempt by Fuji to get rid of as much of the remaining film as possible, as quickly as they can?
     
  4. perkeleellinen

    perkeleellinen Member

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    Tungsten films have died a death at the hands of auto white balance. Pity really as I see lots of these night time indoor shots taken with fast f1.0 - f1.2 lenses and I think a film like 320T or even that Scotchchrome 640T ought to have had a fan base with those shooters. Sadly, my guess is that the proportion of colour shooters who project slides or wet print from negs is very low compared to those who scan and have access to an auto white balance button. In an ideal world, I'd love to see a fast tungsten neg film, perhaps a Fuji 800TZ.
     
  5. Shangheye

    Shangheye Member

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    It's also unbeatable as a cross processed film in daylight. Pull one stop exposure and push develop 1 stop against box speed....you won't be disappointed ;-)K
     
  6. kiebee

    kiebee Member

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    Also they have it in 35mm. Was this made available with the 120, or has this been listed since?
     
  7. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

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    Discontinued in 35mm. Still available in 120 format here in Australia.
     
  8. ozmoose

    ozmoose Member

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    Pulling/pushing T64

    Kal,

    Am particularly interested in your comment about crossprocessing T64 in this thread as I happen to have 40+ rolls frozen for future use and some of it is long in the tooth. I also think it's time I played a bit with some of my old long frozen films and got off the threadmill I'm now on of documentary, documentary, documentary (I shoot mostly stock, architectural, and pet portraits) photo work. Could you elaborate on your comments, please? And is there anywhere I can view some of your crossprocessed work? Greatly appreciated. Thanks from Melbourne, Ozzzz. :cool:
     
  9. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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    I couldn't agree more! Looking thru my old photographs, about 90% of them were taken inside at night with my friends doing 'god knows what in college' and what a difference tungsten balance would've made.... As it is, I'm going to try to put a 80a filter on fujicolor 1600 and see how that works out.

    Also, I happen to have a few rolls of Portra 100T (rare!); any idea how well I could push this? I'm thinking I'll try to push it to 400 and see what happens.
     
  10. perkeleellinen

    perkeleellinen Member

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    You could also try putting an 80a on Provia 400X and pushing it, I think that pushed Provia looks nicer than Superia 1600. I wonder what cross-processed Provia 400X would look like under indoor lighting...
     
  11. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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    I'd like to try that. Is that the best combination for color/speed as far as you've determined? How 'bout pushing 800z or Portra 800 one stop and using a CC filter?
     
  12. perkeleellinen

    perkeleellinen Member

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    I've never had much success with getting a nice look from pushing print films. But pushed Provia 400X looks better to my eye than Superia 1600 at box speed. I read here recently that underexposed Superia 800 looks better than Superia 1600 also.

    A few years back I was shooting in a car museum with Ektachrome 320T and when I ran out I loaded a roll of Provia 400X. I expected to get back some horribly orange slides but they weren't actually that bad - warm but not deep orange as I'd feared. Perhaps this was because of Fuji's 4th layer thing. As for cross processing 400X, it was just an idea I thought of recently but I'm not sure how it would turn out - some examples on flickr seem almost normal in daylight as well as indoors. But that could be due to some correction software.
     
  13. hrst

    hrst Member

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    Superia 1600 looks fantastic. Haven't tried to push it, 1600 has always been enough.

    It isn't much different from Superia 800 but it's faster.

    You can get a bit over EI 400 at most when shooting Provia 400X with 80A and push processing two stops, with somewhat weak, muddy blacks. OTOH, I get great results from Superia 1600 in very warm tungsten light just by overexposing one stop.
     
  14. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/skwp9/3079677428/in/photostream/

    Here's Provia 400x at 800 and as the photographer mentions, the next shot is the same subject but w/ 800z. It's hard to say how much is due to post-manipulation/converting negative into positive, but the Provia looks great.

    Sorry for hijacking the post.
     
  15. perkeleellinen

    perkeleellinen Member

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    The 'highjacking' here is actually producing a better discussion than speculating over T64! I'm thinking of trying hrst's idea of shooting Superia 1600 at 800 indoors.
     
  16. perkeleellinen

    perkeleellinen Member

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  17. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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    Wow, Provia 400x at 1600 wins hands down over the print films. However, a great point is raised at the very bottom; the cost of pushing E6 two stops.

    I guess this wouldn't be an issue for any home brewers, of which I'm not one.
     
  18. perkeleellinen

    perkeleellinen Member

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    Another factor is, I think, how you are displaying your photos - optical print, projection, scan + print, or scan only. I think each method will affect how a film looks in different ways.
     
  19. hrst

    hrst Member

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    You are discussing about scanning the slide film.

    It is completely different than projection.

    Scanning actually benefits from the DMAX loss with consumer-grade scanners because of CCD noise in high density areas.

    OTOH, deep blacks is a MUST for a good projection experience when projecting dark night scenes (those often shot when high EI is most needed!)

    You can get any color balance with any film type you want. With neg film, you have more freedom in darkroom. With slide film, you have to use filters on the lens when shooting.

    In the example above, the photographer has decided to go with very different color balances, which is nice because the same image gets boring if nothing changes. It is not a film comparison. It is not a neg vs. slide film comparison. It does not compare color balances. That same 800Z can have almost any color balance you like.

    Neg film and slide film have completely different purposes. Slide film is mostly for projection and neg film for printing. Both can be used for projection and printing but are quite different beasts, each having their own benefits and drawbacks.

    I can say from experience that you CAN print that Fuji 800Z image as magentaish as the Provia picture -- but you CAN NOT print that Provia picture as greenish or neutral as the 800Z picture, at least not very easily.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 20, 2010
  20. jamesgignac

    jamesgignac Member

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    I really hope it comes back - I loved my T64 each and every time I used it. I bought up the last of the stock from my local, family-owned lab several months back...then I moved away and it's now in the possession of my ex-girlfriend...it's a good thing she's a great photographer otherwise I'd be bummed!

    Anyhow, hope it comes back and I hope I can find it now that I'm on the other side of the planet.