Tele-Rollei(flex) is back

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by sanderx1, Sep 16, 2006.

  1. sanderx1

    sanderx1 Member

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    From the new web site of Franke & Heidecke Gmbh - Rolleiflex 4,0FT - takes 120 format film, has a 135mm, f/4 HFT Tele-Xenar from Schneider for taking and a 135mm f/4 Heidosmat for viewing. Good to see new film cameras being introduced and evenmore, new TLR-s
     
  2. Amund

    Amund Member

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    The best news is that the closest focus distance is now 1.5 meter, instead of the lousy 2.6m in the old models. I bet it will be expensive though...
     
  3. jmailand

    jmailand Member

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    If Bill Gates is secretly out there he can send me the Rolleiflex 4.0 W. :cool:

    James,
     
  4. Bromo33333

    Bromo33333 Member

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    Of COURSE it will be big bucks! It is a Rolleiflex! :smile:

    You KNOW that it will be! After all Rollei can sometimes make Hasselblad look affordable for new equipment! :surprised:

    Rollei 6008 kit new (Adorama) USD 4499 - 5199 depending upon the lens
    Rolleiflex 2.8 FX USD 3800
    Rolleifles 4.0 FW USD 4799

    Hasselblad 503 CW kit incl lens USD 4054
    Hasselblad 905 SWC USD 6588 :rolleyes:

    I can only imagine that the Rolleiflex FW will be about USD 5000

    They are all first rate equipment and if you can afford it new, you probably won't be dissappointed, but holy-cow it is expensive.
     
  5. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

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    Heck, as part of his Arts foundation, why not endow each one of us with one! If Bill is willing, I'll gladly post my address.
     
  6. Gene_Laughter

    Gene_Laughter Member

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    It's really not that difficult to come up with the bread for a Tele- Rollei. I was offered several million dollars yesterday for simply being the USA agent in investing money from Nigeria. I'm certain the offers are legit for the emails came from higher ups in the government. ;>)

    Gene
     
  7. Bromo33333

    Bromo33333 Member

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    Nigerians to sell Tele-Rollei

    You know, if you asked the Nigerian investor to sell you a Tele Rollei, I am sure they would do so ... cheap. :wink:
     
  8. RidingWaves

    RidingWaves Member

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    Well, the comparison between Hassy and Rollei is not quite fair. To match the out-of-the-box Rollei, you'd need to add a metered prism and a motor. Plus you'd still would not have AE, both Shutter and Apeture Priority as well as full Auto. Oh yeah, Spot, Mulit-Spot and an Awesome Matrix type. Oh, and 1/1000 top flash sync speed with 1/3 stops for shutter, (which is nice for tweaking ambient light levels with daylight flash). So, yeah, its expensive, but add it up, and you still get a better camera with Rollei.
     
  9. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Member

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    This is not exactly news. I handled this camera at the PMA show six months ago. It's nice.

    Cheers,

    Roger
     
  10. Bromo33333

    Bromo33333 Member

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    Yup - Rollei has value for money but you need a LOT of it.

    Granted that Rollei and Hasselblad offer a lot of value for the money, but for either one - boy is it a LOT of money new! (which was my point) :smile:

    But if you aren't in a position to shell out $4k+ for new gear, you have to consider used. And this is where Hasselblad has a strong advantage in the US on the secondary market.

    We own a Hasselblad because we can get scads of good quality used gear for (still expensive but a whole lot more) reasonable prices - and we can even rent some of the more exotic and expensive pieces of gear. Repairs are easily performed and there are lots of people that can do this, and aside from some of the older lenses, not too expensive considering new equipment prices. I don't know how it is where you are - but here in NY this is a big advantage.

    No argument that both are fine cameras - and new, Rollei may have an advantage, but for more modest means, Hasselblad can get you there, too! (For this reason along the Rollei system is out of my reach for SLR's)

    For TLR's, though, Rollei has a HUGE advantage for the same reason! Lots of installed base, repairs are reasonable, and between Rolleiflex and Rolleicord - there are lots of equipment available for cheap!

    I didn't mean to start a "which camera is better" argument - I will preemptively agree with you that Rollei is "better" than Hasselblad since nothing good can come of this discussion! :smile:

    Peace,
     
  11. Ole

    Ole Moderator Staff Member

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    For some strange reason, I just had a quick look at my ancient Mamiya C3...

    Takes 120 film
    Close focus to a few cm
    interchangable lenses - I have 80 and 180mm.
    Flash sync at all shutter speeds.
    Use a separate hand held meter for spot, average, incident or flash metering.
    Spare lens elements - viewing and taking lenses are identical, so a scratched taking lens can be swapped with the viewing lens (which seems to be immune to scratches and "cleaning marks"?).

    Weight: Can also be used as hammer, anvil or boat anchor...
     
  12. Mike Kovacs

    Mike Kovacs Member

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    For me, opening a brand new Rollei TLR out of the box is the stuff dreams are made of. And it will continue to be a dream for a long, long, long time!

    It sure would be nice to have all three TLRs hanging around your neck covering an event.
     
  13. Greg_E

    Greg_E Member

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    From a repair point of view, the Rollei's are the best I've worked on. I have a couple 'cords and a Yashica 635 and Yashicamat that I've worked on. The 'cords are so much easier to deal with. I wish I could afford a new Rollei TLR, but that just will never happen. Even the Seagull TLRs are expensive now (for what they are). It would be real nice if there was a new "Volkskamera" again like the 'cord used to be, instead of the mega dollar curio that we have now.
     
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  15. sanderx1

    sanderx1 Member

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    Sorry, it was a news for me - it didn't appear to be common knowledge and it wasn't discussed here.
     
  16. Helen B

    Helen B Member

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    It's good to see the new Tele finally arrive.

    There's been a fairly long, but perhaps not very well publicised, history of the two new models. The wide and the tele were shown as mock-ups years ago, then the wide - the 4.0FW - appeared. The rumours about the new tele were that Rollei wanted to avoid having to use the Rolleinars for reasonably close focussing, so the new tele was slower to appear. I recall an official announcement on the Rollei website a while back that the tele project had been abandoned because of that, but my memory might be playing tricks.

    The 4.0FW is a pleasure to use, and I suspect that the 4.0FT will be as well. I wonder how much the Bay IV lens hood will cost for the Tele. The skimpy hood for the 4.0FW is $325.

    The original Tele-Rolleiflexes are cheaper and more plentiful than the original Wide, but the close-focussing distance is a bit of a bind - though not a lot because the hinged Rolleinar 0.35 is easy enough to flip in and out. There are snaps taken with both the 4.0FW (1, 2) and the original Tele (3) in my gallery here on APUG.

    Best,
    Helen
     
  17. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Member

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    Sorry, didn't mean to sound sniffy: I was just surprised that no-one else had apparently heard of it. It was reported in my Shutterbug coverage of PMA Borelando, February -- report in May issue, I think -- and at the time I was promised one for review as soon as it was available; perhaps I can pick one up at photokina.

    Cheers,

    Roger
     
  18. RidingWaves

    RidingWaves Member

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    Yeah, the whole Rollei/Hassy thing was something I went thru a few years ago. I needed a MF kit for some of my work, and I was willing to sink some dough into something good, so I compared everything out there. I needed a motor, and at least a meter in camera, with AE being a useful extra. Of course, lenses needed to be great, but at that end, they are all in that league. I'd used Hassy, Bronica, Pentax, Mamiya (645 and 67) and tinkered with Contax. Hassy and RZ were top contenders, both had strong points. Hassy was smaller (and a bit 'fussy') but needed lots of (mentioned) add ons like the RZ which seemed kinda big and not that portable (and a bit slow as well). I got the Fine Rollei brochure and the more I read it and actually Looked at the system and how it would work in my hands I was convinced it would be what I needed. Mind you, I never even had one in hand, and nobody I knew even had one in the whole state of Hawaii ( I still think I have the only one) and rentals were out of the question so I did it, got it, bought it outright sight unseen. Pulled it out of the box and went, yup this is what I need, this works for me. First day I used it, shot 20 rolls lickety split, swapping out 3 inserts with a first-time assistant who learned how to load them instantly (try that with an A-12). I had a bit of warranty work done very soon after purchase (circut board) and a bit of small issues with the service but since then its brilliant.
    MF gear is kinda like cars. Hassy seemed to me like a cross between a Saab and Volvo, solid and has its 'quirks', but a bit stodgy and obsintant when pushed. Contax looked like a Lexus, all flashy displays up on the dash. Mamiya is the Toyota/Honda of MF, straight ahead, no frills, last forever. New Pentax was like Nissan, lots of plastic bits just waiting to break. But the Rollei, like a BMW. Get in and everything is in the place its supposed to be. Put it in gear, step on the gas and you go fast, tap the brakes and you stop fast, crisp steering etc. Rollei just has that feeling, like you can use it, like you Want to REALLY use it.
    I'd pay full price again for a Rollei. No doubt.
     
  19. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Member

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    I love your motoring analogies, even though I don't entirely agree with someone who calls a Hasselblad quirky and doesn't find a Rollei TLR so. I've owned both, and given up on both, though for different reasons.

    I never got on with the Rollei or indeed any TLR because of the handling (which I find slow and, yes, quirky). This demonstrates how much of it is personal: neither of us is right or wrong about this.

    I sold the Hasselblad because in those days we didn't scan our own trannies and purblind art directors can crop a square image all kinds of ways -- even when they've signed off a Polaroid with the crop drawn in on it! That's why I went to Mamiya RB67.

    Lately, though, I've been thinking of buying another Hasselblad, partly for old time's sake. My own view is that the Hasselblad is closer to a Bentley, or maybe even a Bristol, but then, I regard BMWs (saloons/sedans, anyway) as nothing special. Take a Ford; build it as well as you possibly can; and you have a BMW. I just don't find them as exciting/inspiring as you do(And yes, I have driven all of them).

    And maybe a Rollei TLR is a top-of-the-line Range Rover: enormously strong, but big and chunky. I'll believe that if you do get along with them well, they're faster to use than Hasselblads, though.

    Cheers,

    Roger
     
  20. George Papantoniou

    George Papantoniou Member

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    Rolleiflex is a religion, the Mamiya TLR's have never been one...

    (will this post - about religious matters - make the thread migrate to the soapbox ???)
     
  21. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Member

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    Nah, just a small penance. Three Hail Ansels.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  22. Richard Kelham

    Richard Kelham Member

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    I suspect, from reading between the lines, that the Rollei RidingWaves was extolling is the 6008 rather than the TLR. Perhaps a Mercedes E series?


    Richard
     
  23. HerrBremerhaven

    HerrBremerhaven Member

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    Hello Richard,

    Having used a 6008i several times, I am inclined to say Porsche. The TLR seemed more like a Trabi, but a really well built example.
    :D

    Ciao!

    Gordon Moat
    A G Studio
     
  24. RidingWaves

    RidingWaves Member

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    Oh, best clarify. I was talking about the 6008i. Porche analogy would be correct as well, perhaps more so since you'll cry the same when its time to get fixed! As for R.Hicks and BMW and Fords, have you driven a Ford..Lately? So very bad, but I've heard those English Fords are slightly better (I guess they call them Jaguar?) but Not in BMW arena. If you think about how to use a Hassy (properly) and if you have common photographic experience, just try to imagine getting it to work quickly or using it without jamming it. And like I said, try teaching a newby assistant to load an A-12 correctly (and quickly). Trabant, that's like the Kiev or Seagull?
     
  25. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Member

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    That's what I meant, really. Take a boring car and make it properly, and you have a well-made boring car, or B.M.W. (Boring, Made Well?). Make it like a Ford and you have a Ford...

    Trabbis are a world unto themselves. Two-stroke, GRP body, no fuel gauge or external filler cap. They now have a cult following, like Holgas, except that the Trabbis that are still on the road have beem subjected to Darwinian selection and therefore run. Unlike Holgas.

    In the studios where I worked in the 70s we used Hasselblads reasonably hard and fast -- photographing lions and tigers is often best done quickly -- and we seldom jammed them, but I take your point about teaching assistants to use A12s. I WAS an assistant then -- but it still took only 5 minutes to learn how to use it.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  26. Richard Kelham

    Richard Kelham Member

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    I reckon that learning to load a Hasselblad magazine was one of the more useful tthings I learnt at Art School. A12s are easy compared to the old 12on type!



    Richard