testing meter (Sekonic)

Discussion in 'Exposure Discussion' started by bherg, Jul 30, 2006.

  1. bherg

    bherg Member

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    Hello,

    I recently bought a Sekonic Dualmaster L-588, since i havent had a meter like this before, this exakt with 1 degree spot.

    Yesterday i was out with a friend shooting some super 8 film, even thou this isnt the cine version it have some fp/s modes.

    But i got the feeling the meter isnt right on where it should be.

    Are there a way to check that it measures correct.

    Are there a way to calibrate it if it isnt dead on?



    Cheers Johannes
     
  2. Helen B

    Helen B Member

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    Did you notice a discrepancy between the camera meter and the L-558? How far off do you think the meter is? You could always check it in full sunlight, when the 'sunny 16' rule should apply (at f/16, the indicated shutter speed should be about equal to the reciprocal of the ISO film speed, eg 1/125 for ISO 100 film). The camera meter reading could be affected by a beamsplitter and a D-A filter. The shutter angle could also be different from 180°. Which camera, which frame rate, which shutter speed on the meter etc?

    The best way is to calibrate the meter to the camera by shooting a test to find the best film speed to set on the camera.

    Best,
    Helen
     
  3. dmr

    dmr Member

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    The one thing that kinda bothers me is that there doesn't seem to be any convenient way of comparing an in-camera light meter to a truly known standard. Everybody says to use "sunny 16" as a sanity check, and I'm realizing that it's about as good a test as you can get without resorting to laboratory grade equipment.

    I recently recalibrated my QL17 GIII so it would take ISO1600 film, and lacking anything else, I used the exposure of the Pentax K1000 to compare with. It seems to expose properly in both low and high light situations.

    Actually, I think I'm realizing that the best test is with film under the situations you're likely to shoot.

    My last "sanity check" roll was some normal and high-contrast (white rocks along a railroad and shadows under the trees) scenes, with 5 frames each, one as the meter said, then 1 and 2 stops over and 1 and 2 stops under.

    It gives a good warm fuzzy feeling that the meter is close enough to take real-world photos, but something kinda nags at me that it's not really traceable to any standard. :smile:

    What''s kind of eye opening is that on some normal contrast scenes, there's really not that much difference between the normal, and +/- 1 stop frames. The modern color negative film (Fuji 200 in this case) really does have some good latitude in it.

    Oh well ... :smile: