Tetenal C41 Rapid and stop bath

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by jrydberg, Jun 2, 2009.

  1. jrydberg

    jrydberg Member

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    You guys who reuse your Tetenal C41 chems, do you also run an extra stop bath between the first and second step?

    I read in the manual that you could run an extra stop bath to save the BX chemicals.
     
  2. jrydberg

    jrydberg Member

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    The tutorial here states the following:

    "If you re-use blix it is also recommended to use stop bath and rinse between dev and blix."

    Can anyone confirm this?
     
  3. Kevin Caulfield

    Kevin Caulfield Subscriber

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    Yes, I've only started using Tetenal recently, since Agfa's demise, but have added the stop bath step as recommended. Just 1:19 dilution for about 30 secs.
     
  4. jrydberg

    jrydberg Member

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    You're not using plain old acetic acid?

    BTW, do you developed on a processor such as ATL 1500?
     
  5. glaiben

    glaiben Member

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    I use Tetenal's C41 5L kit in a Jobo 1520 tank w/ manual inversion. Using a 500 ml chemistry batch, I process 2 rolls at a time and will do a total of 3 runs per chemical batch. I have not done a fourth run because the BX time is too long for my taste (15 min). I have not used a stop bath of any kind (acetic acid or water) between CD and BX and have had no problems. Have not noticed any difference between the films run in any of the batches. _If_ I were to do a 4th run, I would probably do an acid stop bath, but this is not based on empirical evidence - would simply be erring on the side of caution.
     
  6. AgX

    AgX Member

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    Tetenal does not refer to any stop bath in their processing table for "COLORTEC C-41 NEGATIV KIT RAPID".

    However in the following text they state:
    "Stop Bath (Tetenal Indicet or Acetic Acid 3%, 20sec) will reduce chance of processing failure* for the Bleach Fix bath."

    *[my translation] The original term is "Verarbeitungssicherheit".
     
  7. jrydberg

    jrydberg Member

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    glaiben:

    I'm doing pretty much the exact same thing as you; two rolls in 500ml of chemicals (lately I've only been using 330 ml though, using the visual indicator on the chemical bottles in the ATL-1500).

    AgX: My english instructions says "stop bath increases processing reliability when the bleach bix bath is re-used several times."


    The problems I'm having is two fold (they might be related):

    1. i get a cyan cast on my negatives. the cast increases by each re-use of the chemicals. I have yet not figured out if it is because of depleted first developer, or if I need to blix more. Any clues?

    2. some of my first developer still over to the blix. after two re-uses i have maybe 25% more BX than FD. i guess this is because of some of the first developer is sticking to the film, or there is some problem with my ATL 1500.

    i was thinking that using a stop bath migth fix the second issue, somehow.

    has anyone of you guys seen cyan casts on any of your negatives?
     
  8. glaiben

    glaiben Member

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    Altho I am neither a chemical or Jobo expert, I think this may be your problem. That seems to be way too much developer carry-over into the BX. That much developer can't cling to the reel and film - maybe a few ml's at most.

    I have no color cast difference at all between film runs.