Tetenol Light Protecting Varnish

Discussion in 'Presentation & Marketing' started by thefizz, Sep 16, 2005.

  1. thefizz

    thefizz Subscriber

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    I was looking at Silverprints web site and came across Tetenol Light Protecting Varnish. Has anyone used this product or know much about it?

    It comes in a can and is sprayed on to your finished print. Here is the information given on the site:

    "For use with traditional print materials, monochrome or colour, FB or RC.
    Available in matt, semi-matt or glossy, this aerosol varnish has ultraviolet absorbing properties, useful when used with colour prints to prevent fading when displayed in strong light. The varnishes also physically protect the print, and an appropriate varnish can be used to change the nature of the print surface, converting a glossy print to matt & vice-versa."

    Regards,
    Peter
     
  2. Dave Miller

    Dave Miller Member

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    I’ve used it to change an R/C print from glossy to matt finish. It did the job, but like all such sprays is messy to use. Much better to print on the correct paper to start with. I’ve also used it on inkjet prints; in a previous life.
     
  3. thefizz

    thefizz Subscriber

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    Hi Dave,

    Do you know how this product performs archivally?
     
  4. Keith Tapscott.

    Keith Tapscott. Member

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    You mean that you`ve actually done digital imaging in a previous incarnation? :D
     
  5. Dave Miller

    Dave Miller Member

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    Yep! Been there, done that; and got bored witless. Darkroom is cheaper too.
     
  6. Dave Miller

    Dave Miller Member

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    I can't answer that; I havn't lived long enough, yet! Make a note to ask me again in fifty years.
     
  7. Jorge

    Jorge Inactive

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    So how did it work with ink jet prints?
     
  8. Dave Miller

    Dave Miller Member

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    They burned much better!
     
  9. Keith Tapscott.

    Keith Tapscott. Member

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    I use both darkroom and digital, usually the former. Digital allows me to have a bit of fun making theatrical portraits like Ghost, Vampires and other wierd and perhaps not so wonderful subjects along with convenient retouching to rid skin blemishes etc.
    When it comes down to B&W though, I prefer good old fashioned traditional silver gelatin prints everytime, the magic of seeing an image start to appear in the dim glow of a safelight is still as exiting to me now as it ever was.
    I feel that I have had more input into the final image than doing it digitally and I prefer the final results.
     
  10. edz

    edz Member

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    Sure, its a good acryllic vanish not unlike those used as a coating for artwork. These lacquers has been an integral part of art for centuries--- granted not acryllic but colophonium or some solution of natural resins of mastic, dammar, amber, copal, sandarac or even myrrh--- and were early-on adopted into photography.

    Tetenal's varinish is mainly used for sealing work following retouching but also to prepare work for retouching. Its also (the glossy version) good for handling scratches on the base-- its the same stuff in a spray can that Repolisan was in a bottle.

    Better than purchase aerosol cans I'd advice one to get the stuff in a bulk (1 litre tins). Should one need to spray, one can use airbrush..
     
  11. Jim_in_Kyiv

    Jim_in_Kyiv Member

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    Myrrh!

    Finally. After Brian is born, I'll know what to do with the Myrrh.

    Or was that too obscure?
     
  12. edz

    edz Member

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    Mystical and arcane varnishes

    I'll take the gold.... But frankincense too has been used in varnishes.. Like myrrh their use has been mainly in wood varnishes for string instruments (from violin to double bass). Stradivarius is said to have used propolis in some of his varnishes.
    Among the natural resin varnishes I tend to favor for photographs those based upon dammar (and beeswax to maniplate the "texture" from glossy to matt) and amber.. These are, however, less than ideal for--- and many completely ill-suited or incompatible to--- resin (plastic) coated papers.