The back of the framed picture?..

Discussion in 'Presentation & Marketing' started by Sean, Oct 18, 2004.

  1. Sean

    Sean Admin Staff Member Admin

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    I've seen some framers seal the back of their framed pictures, usually using a brown paper bag like material and brown tape. I am wondering what you guys do with finished, framed prints. Do you leave the back open exposing the actual mat board which holds the print? Does having an open back affect archival stability, or does sealing or having a panel on the back add problems in itself? thanks!
     
  2. Aggie

    Aggie Member

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    I learned a long time ago, there are small little bugs, even in the most spotless house that like to get into picture frames. I was again told to get those little packets of bug stuff to tape to the pack of the picture. They last for a few years. I have not had a bit of trouble since then. You seal the back with brown paper, and you can't get the packet where you want it. Also if the picture slips in the matting, you have to tear the paper off. Some of the purchased art work I have, this has happened to. IT IS a PIA to take off and replace.
     
  3. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    sean -

    i used to work in a frame shop and have never gotten that brown craft paper out of my system. ... i will usually window mat the photograph, and then put in a plain black frame. i will then smear elmer's glue ( paper glue ) around the frame's back and put the paper on. the paper is then cut with a razor blade and a wet rag/sponge/paper towel wipes the craft paper to make it tight when it is dried out :smile:

    ( the frame, i usually buy wood "chop" from a local framer who gives me a slight discount, and when i need it, i use corner vices and glue/nail them together. you can get a "framer" and nails for not too much $$ to finish the whole operation ) ...

    - john
     
  4. John McCallum

    John McCallum Member

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    The tape you mention is quite important, I believe. Additionally to keeping the bugs out, it'll slow any rapid increases in humidity levels which mould can thrive on.
    For the framing to be regarded as Archival, the print should have an acid free matt behind as well as being overmatted. Les' method of the matt sandwich is very convenient. Additionally, I add a foam board then use the brown tape to seal it all. The tape generally used for framing is quite expns, but readily available and Tayles Framing Supplies have the best prices I've found.
    best, john.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 18, 2004
  5. Joe Symchyshyn

    Joe Symchyshyn Member

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    I only use metal frames for my photography, so I never use the paper cover on the back. The paper is standard practice for wood frames.

    For metal frames I skip the spring clips because they don't hold the mat(s), mount, and backboard tight and even to the ENTIRE surface of the glass.

    What I feel works best is small strips of acid free corrugated cardboard. (It's a blue cardboard that I get from my mat board supplier). The strips fill the entire space below the frame moulding and the backer board and prevent any little bugs from sneaking in between the glass and top mat.

    Another option that I have seen is taping the glass/mat&mount/backer together to form one unit. The tape seals out all moisture and prevents critters from entering. I don't do it, but have seen it done before.

    joe :smile: