The Future of Photography (as photographers saw it in 1944)

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by Jeff Dyck, Aug 8, 2005.

  1. Jeff Dyck

    Jeff Dyck Member

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    I came across a link to this interesting article, published in 1944:

    The Future of Photography

    There are some very interesting and portentous predictions. I had to chuckle when I read "the day of the 11x14, 8x10, and even the 5x7 negative is about over" - that was written 60 years ago!

    Enjoy.
     
  2. MikeS

    MikeS Member

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    And it's absolutely correct! You can't take a quote out of context (well, you CAN, but it would be wrong). The words directly preceding that statement make it absolutely correct

    "Except for special purposes, the day of the 11x14, 8x10, and even the 5x7 negative is about over."

    LF photography IS a special purpose. You don't see families on vacation lugging around an 8x10 Kodak 2D with them! (Yes, I know, some of US might do that, but that's not what I mean!)

    -Mike
     
  3. bjorke

    bjorke Member

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    That is a great link, but more IMO for the Abbot, Strand and Maholy-Nagy quotes. The rest is just technical marketing.
     
  4. Jorge

    Jorge Inactive

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    That was a great link! Do you think if they had had the internet they would have had pissing contests about LF vs 35 mm?
     
  5. esanford

    esanford Member

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    Thanks for posting... a very interesting article...
     
  6. TerryThomasAtlanta

    TerryThomasAtlanta Member

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    no mention of computers or TV

    Even though both television and computers existed by 1944 no one put them together with photography. And who could blame them as both took up huge resources and energy.

    Interesting that Elliott described the Polaroid camera's workings when he said he would like to see a camera that dry developed it's own film. (Does Mr. Land owe him a check?) Guess having to worry about film processing on the front lines made him think that through.

    Also, they all expected the American Industry to produce top-notch cameras and lenses. Bet they were surprised what happened in the 20 years after 1944.

    How smart are we now? Anyone care to predict what photography will be like 60-odd years from now?