The Lesser OM Family Member

The Lesser OM Family Member

  1. Michael L.

    Michael L. Subscriber

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    Michael L. submitted a new resource:

    The Lesser OM Family Member - The Lesser OM Family Member

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  2. munz6869

    munz6869 Subscriber

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    I learnt photography with my OM20 - that camera is very battered and unreliable now, but it travelled from Nauru to Switzerland, and never let me down!

    Marc!
     
  3. Newt_on_Swings

    Newt_on_Swings Member

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    I have an OM10, but don't use it much, but I was indoctrinated into the Om cult though a double digit body as well, the OM-40 (om-pc). Great pictures were also attained from the supposedly lesser body too. I actually still like it a lot, but it's stored away now. Maybe it'll be a gift one day to someone else starting out. The manual speed adapter is a necessity for the om10 though, and probably the only thing I really disliked about that body. Going toward the om4t though is a huge step, but very worth it. I still lust after an affordable om3 or om3t.
     
  4. jp498

    jp498 Member

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    An OM10 was my first SLR back in the late 80's. I used it for a couple years till I got into sports photography and desired a Nikon for more FPS and more lens options. I shot thousands of excellent photos with the OM10. It was lighter, quieter and smoother than the normal K1000 most people used. I won't say anything bad about it. In the late 80's Olympus's SLR system was at a dead end with the OM77af as their technical wonder which left me underwhelmed. Between their EOL system and my need for a sports camera, I had to choose between Canon and Nikon and went Nikon because I could borrow lotsa nice lenses.

    I adjusted exposure by either using the film speed dial as exposure compensation dial or using the flash sync speed and varying the aperture.
     
  5. grahamp

    grahamp Subscriber

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    I gave my sister one for her 21st birthday. She had her choice of anything she wanted within reason, and that was the most comfortable replacement for her Mamiya DeLuxe rangefinder that had just died. That OM10 with a manual adapter is still ticking along.
     
  6. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    Ive gone through two OM-10s, both bought new and both died within a year of purchase. I wont deny the capability of the model to be able to produce a great photo, thats actually the operators responsibility, but capable. My only complaint was durability. I am rough on my gear. My OM-1s are beat up from years of hanging around my neck in all places, even when driving, and show the "love".
    The internal mechanism of the 10 just didn't survive me. Both cameras locked up, never to wind film again, and bought for so cheap, not worth repairing. I paid less than a hundred dollars each for them.
     
  7. Someonenameddavid

    Someonenameddavid Member

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  8. dsmccrac

    dsmccrac Member

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    Your defense of the OM10 is gallant and almost brought a tear to my eye, as a long time fanboy of OM. Now don't hate me but I am one of those folks that has been burned a bit by a few OM10 purchases. My friends know I obsess about having the perfect 'beach camera ' - something with great optics but simple and not expensive, so when the grit works its way into the lens I will not weep. I have my old om2/50 1.4 from the eighties and it was killing me to have it come back gritty. It was not really the reverence to it being a single digit OM but more that it was my old friend. So I bought my first OM10 and it had a funky light meter. I bought a second and its light meter seems to be always accurate but it often does not display what the setting is. In my mythical beach example I worry about over exposing with the lens nice and wide. Usually some combination of turning it off and one, putting it in self timer mode, or jumping up and down while spinning in circles will sometimes do the trick, but not always.

    This is my only issue I have with them. I think their display - which was fancier than that if the OM2 - does not age well. Otherwise it is a great camera.

    All you OM10s out there: I am trying to love you! I am trying to not be some stuck up single digit OM fanboy! But please, I wanna properly exposed photo (and know what the exposure is)!!
     
  9. Chris Nielsen

    Chris Nielsen Member

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    I had a sweet OM10 a couple of years ago, it was so smooth it was a joy to use. I sold it when I went Nikon, only to subsequently discover I missed Olympus so I went back. I love my OM2N but there was something about the OM10, it was lighter for one thing. Our local auction site is very hit and miss for old camera gear unfortunately
     
  10. dsmccrac

    dsmccrac Member

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    Haha. I hope I will not be burned again. I am likely picking up another OM 10 - a good deal on one with a manual adapter! So OM-10, I am giving you one more chance!! (Or I am back to the 'single digits')
     
  11. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    The OM G/OM 20 is an OM 10 with the bugs worked out and the manual exposure built in.

    If someone is looking for one, I have an extra ...
     
  12. RH Designs

    RH Designs Advertiser

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    I bought an OM-10 new when they first came out in, I think, 1978. I still have it and as far as I know it still works although I haven't used it for years. When I was using it heavily it never put a foot wrong and repeatedly delivered well exposed slides with the help of a manual adaptor. Given all the bad-mouthing of the OM-10 on the web it's nice to read a positive resumé of what was at the time probably the best of the "budget" auto SLRs. It was the best-selling SLR in the UK for several years I think. My only complaint is that the price just about halved within a year of my purchase - perhaps later ones were not as well built in order to get the price down. I've stuck with the OM system ever since and never regretted it.
     
  13. nicholai

    nicholai Member

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    Ive had my best 35mm shots on an OM10 and OM20. I still use these in the studio if i know im about to shoot a shitload of shots. Motordrive and affordability paired with the excellent zuiko lenses makes this the best choice for that.
     
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  15. Darren O'Keeffe

    Darren O'Keeffe Member

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    The OM10 was my first proper camera, new in 1982--and it still works well, although I seldom use it now. Light and reliable--and of course as it uses the same lenses as the single digit OM's, its pictures are every bit as good...

    Regards,
    D.
     
  16. fish95th

    fish95th Member

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    I really have some sympathy with Michael L's post - it inspired me to join this forum (and make a first post). I've never owned, or used, an OM10. When I was looking for an SLR to replace my Zenit TTL back in 1984/5 I was warned off the OM10 in similar tones - not a 'real *man's* camera was the gist - why? Mainly because it was auto only and *real* men used an OM1. So I bought an OM1 - it's been with me ever since - up mountains and cliffs, down caves, across the world. It too 'shows the love'.... and now I have an OM2n. But... I hanker after an OM10 (anything Olympus in fact - to add to the Trip, the XA2 and the 35RC). A camera becomes part of one after such a long time and returns the affection - of that I'm sure. So long live Michael's OM10!!
     
  17. ambaker

    ambaker Subscriber

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    Michael, I hope your OM10 gives you many more years of unfailing service.

    If you are looking at buying a camera, other people's experiences are something to consider.

    If you own a camera, then your own experiences matter most. If your camera dies every other roll, it doesn't matter that it is rated as one of the most reliable. Even from factories with the best QC, a lemon slips through. And in the factories with the worst QC, a gem beats the odds.

    Fear not, enjoy the camera and get out there and shoot!

    My first SLR, was a Yashica TL Super Electro X. Had it for 15 years. Replaced the shutter twice. It was with me in Vietnam, my wedding, my first and second child. Bought a Canon A-1, and sold the Yashica. I regret it to this day.

    Sent from my AT100 using Tapatalk 2
     
  18. Andrew Wheeler

    Andrew Wheeler Member

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    OM 2000

    Nice post, a good camera to consider is the OM 2000, I don't know if many are around second hand but I have always found mine to be reliable and easy to use. It has spot metering too and is exceptionally light. With a 35 mm lens you almost don't feel it around your neck.
     
  19. darinwc

    darinwc Subscriber

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    People always whine about some cameras not being 'professional' enough. You would think people on this board would be more welcoming considering film is no longer the in thing.. but we get more of the same.
    I had a Canon AE1 which was reliable and took great pictures. Then I "moved up" to an A1 which had random electrical issues and an F1N which the film take-up spool would catch the film sprockets wrong and eat the film.
    And finally I switched completely to Olympus. In may ways I miss my AE1 and I feel that people trash-talking many entry-level cameras are misleading. Many entry-level cameras of previous decades are more than adequate.
     
  20. Karl K

    Karl K Subscriber

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    OM-10 weakness

    The OM System initially was not built for heavy professional use. Ham-handed American photo-journalists jumped on the OM System when it first appeared and were soon back to using their Nikons after the OM bodies suffered failures in their film transports. Olympus recognized this defect and beefed up the film transports during the early years of production, but by that time the damage had already been done and very few American photo-journalists ever returned to the Maitani-san fold. Japanese photo-journalists were much gentler when they used the film advance lever and the instances of OM failures in Japan were infrequent.

    The OM-10 and other OM bodies can live much much longer when mated with the OM Winder, instead of using the normal film winding lever. That's the secret of keeping those classic OM bodies and their fine lenses going and going and going....
     

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  21. dsmccrac

    dsmccrac Member

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    Hi ken. I am not sure if you have some insider information and i am not sure what you mean by 'heavy' but I don't agree that the OM system was not designed for 'heavy professional use'. I may concede that they may not have been designed for 'ham fisted (north) Americans' (I have added the 'north' to include us occasionally ham fisted canucks.)

    In fact I remember olympus making much of the use of the om1 as a favorite of war photos in the Vietnam war where the size of the kit mattered.

    So to recap, I am not saying they are as or more robust (or less for that matter) than nikons of the day, but to clarify that it was intended as a pro camera. Pound per pound they are certainly durable, as my original om2 (which bounced around India with me in the eighties) can attest to! ;-)
     
  22. Karl K

    Karl K Subscriber

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    That information about Olympus deciding to "beef up" the OM's original film advance components was told directly to me by an Olympus Regional salesman. At the time, I was managing a large retail camera shop in NJ. We had a few OM film advance failures early on, which Olympus quickly fixed, and then assured us that the "problem had been identified and corrected."

    The size and weight of the OM System were the big selling points, as well as the large viewfinder. Certainly, OM cameras were used in Vietnam, but the Nikon F was far and away the camera of choice because of it's heavy-duty construction.
     
  23. dsmccrac

    dsmccrac Member

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    Interesting story on the original advance levers being problematic on the OMs. I presume we are talking early OM-1? It is a lot to ask of a conversation that happened a while ago ;-) but do you remember when that was? The OM bodies i have bought are usually newer ones (and like the 2n the best) so maybe that is why I have not personally seen this issue. Also I know I am a small sample set haha.)

    Even if I knew it would preserve the life of my OM, I am not sure I would use a powerwinder - the small size of the system is one of the things I like.

    BTW, not challenging a rugged old Nikon could likely pound nails longer than an OM, but I do not baby my OMs ;-)
     
  24. Newt_on_Swings

    Newt_on_Swings Member

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    I have jammed the film advance on an om40 and one of my om4ts by just advancing too quick and with a bit too much force. Easily fixed by popping the bottom plate and unjamming though. But I carry two bodies when I can so it hasn't affected me.
     
  25. Karl K

    Karl K Subscriber

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    Weak OM film advance

    That's exactly what I was referring to in my original post.
    I seem to recall it was about 1973.

    The next year saw the introduction of the Canon AE-1 and that became the hot camera in the amateur market. Canon sold more versions of the AE-1, AE-1P, AV-1, A-1, T50, T70, T90, etc. than any other brand.
    Everyone else began playing catchup.
    It wasn't until ten years later, when the Minolta Maxxum was introduced, that Canon's lead began to erode a bit.
    Olympus, Fuji, Konica, Pentax, and Yashica, never fully recovered.

    Only four lens mounts from those days remain today in the digital world: Canon EOS, Nikon, Pentax, and Sony (Minolta Maxxum).
    From about 1965 to about 1995 were the "glory" years for 35mm SLRs.
    The transition went from fully manual to built-in metering to automatic exposure to auto-focus.
    Those were the days!
     
  26. coat953

    coat953 Member

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    Shame on anyone who denigrates the OM10! It was my first camera and it travelled all over the Sahara and West Africa with me, through dust and being dropped in a lake. It never let me down and led to a life-long love of OMs. I still have it, 32 years on, though now it's been joined by an OM1, 2 and a couple of 4tis. I know a lot of photographers who started on the OM10 and they all loved it.