The Logan 700-S Simplex Studio

Discussion in 'Presentation & Marketing' started by dancqu, Feb 12, 2010.

  1. dancqu

    dancqu Member

    Messages:
    3,676
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2002
    Location:
    Willamette V
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I'll likely be buying the 700-S. I'm attracted by it's
    sturdy build, production stop, and compactness.
    As a last check, have any experience with the
    Logan 700-S? Dan
     
  2. Greg Davis

    Greg Davis Member

    Messages:
    2,057
    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2004
    Location:
    Nicholasvill
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    I've used the beginner 300 series and now the pro 650. They have both worked very well, so the 700 should be fine, even for a large number of photographs.
     
  3. Nicholas Lindan

    Nicholas Lindan Advertiser Advertiser

    Messages:
    2,385
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2006
    Location:
    Cleveland, O
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    If you are doing a really large number then I would get a Fletcher. If you are going to do volume be sure to get one with a squaring arm and production stops, be it Logan, C+H or Fletcher.
     
  4. Ken Nadvornick

    Ken Nadvornick Subscriber

    Messages:
    5,045
    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2005
    Location:
    Monroe, WA, USA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I own and use one of these, Dan.

    Used to cut mats with a straightedge by hand. This is a huge improvement. I'm a very low-volume user, but this unit is capable of higher volumes than I run through it. However, it's not really intended for commercial-level production.

    It's compact size is a big benefit in my cramped situation. Build quality is more than sufficient for its class. It comes with an instructional video on CD, but I never needed to watch it. Reading the included instruction manual was sufficient to get going.

    I get about six or so clean cut jobs (6 jobs x 4 sides = 24 total cuts) before I must change blades. I don't use the included 90-degree cutter, preferring instead my rotary trimmer. The bevel cutter produces nicely consistent cuts. I'm no expert, but others have looked at my mats and asked what shop I had them cut at.

    The production stops are useful, if you maintain consistent cutting parameters. Personally I don't. My mats always seem to be different, so I don't often use that feature. But it does work when I have used it.

    I might advise buying a package of refill blades at the time of purchase. It only comes with five, IIRC.

    Negatives? Minimal and minor. The adjustment scale for border widths is an adhesive sticker. Mine was slightly misapplied, so the distances require a small fudge factor. But I'm pretty anal, so YMMV here.

    And mine also came slightly out-of-square from the factory. But instructions are included for user resquaring. I grabbed my carpenter's square, followed the instructions, and the unit has been good-to-go ever since.

    For it's intended audience, low to moderate volume photographers, I think it's a good bang-for-the-buck deal. I'd recommend it and would buy it again.

    Ken

    [EDIT] Oh yes, one more thing. If you usually purchase bulk mat board and cut it down yourself, bear in mind that this unit can only handle sheets up to a maximum of 20-inches wide. So if you purchase the common 32x40-inch size (or larger) you'll need to make the first cut using something other than the 700-S. This may or may not be a problem for your situation.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 13, 2010
  5. Greg Davis

    Greg Davis Member

    Messages:
    2,057
    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2004
    Location:
    Nicholasvill
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    If you are looking for a cutter for high volume, look at the 850. Like Ken said, the 750 cannot handle full sheets if that is what you intend to cut. The 650 is a smaller version of the pro model that can handle full sheets, but at a lower price than the 850. The Fletcher 2200 is also a very nice high volume cutter, if that is what you need.