The Printed Picture - Richard Benson at MOMA

Discussion in 'Photographers' started by cblurton, Nov 23, 2011.

  1. cblurton

    cblurton Subscriber

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    Sorry if this has been posted before, or if this is the wrong place to post this:

    Richard Benson: The Printed Picture

    http://www.benson.readandnote.com/

    This website was created collaboratively by Richard Benson, photographer, teacher, and former dean of the Yale School of Art, and the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA). The site is based on The Printed Picture exhibition that was on view October 17, 2008 - July 13, 2009 at MoMA. The website provides a comprehensive education in all the primary methods used for printing pictures - relief, intaglio, planographic, and photographic. There are eight hours of Benson's recorded lectures available here, along with "additional images and details, allowing visitors to the site to draw their own path through its contents." The lectures conclude with Benson musing about the value of reproducing images.

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  2. MaximusM3

    MaximusM3 Member

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  3. Maris

    Maris Member

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    Richard Benson perpetuates the fallacy that making photographs is a kind of printing. It is not.

    Benson is not foolish, under-researched, or incapable of original critical thought but he is a good example Wittgenstein's principle that wrong words lead to wrong thoughts. If you say "prints" when you mean photographs pretty soon you will think "prints" instead of photographs and eventually see "prints" where there are actually photographs.

    Maybe it is no big deal if one man espouses an errant notion but if there is no challenge then the mantra "photographs are prints" becomes popular wisdom and from there we move quickly to "prints are photographs". Everyone who has asked for a photograph and been offered an ink-jet printout knows this is true.