The question asked a 1000 times: which camera?

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by jernejk, Feb 12, 2013.

  1. jernejk

    jernejk Member

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    I know, it's been debated over and over, but still, can I ask, please?

    I know I want 6x6. I like the square format (I had Lubitel before it was cool, sadly I gave it away) plus my enlarger only goes to 6x6.

    I'd mostly shoot portraits, macro and landscape. I know, very different subjects requiring quite equipment. If I had to pick 2, I'd probably leave the landscape out, as 35mm is convenient to carry around, and my back seems to object to heavy load.

    Durability is important. Will it last for the next 20, 30 years? Will I find spare parts? A few $100 in price difference today could be meaningless on the long run.

    For now I'm opened to TLR and SLR, but I'm leaning towards SLR due to macro requirements. On the other hand, TLR is more convenient. Maybe I'm better off with 2 cameras?

    Thanks for any suggestions.
     
  2. Vaughn

    Vaughn Subscriber

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    A Mamiya TLR might work for you, especially with a normal and perhaps a longer lens for portraits. The bellows should allow you do do some close up work...but the paralax (sp?) on a TLR would have to be taken into account. Not what I call a light camera, either...but well built. Since the shutter is on the lens, it can be fixed or replaced without affecting the camera body.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/aandaphotography/8352826656/

    (I have no connection with the above camera)
     
  3. wilfbiffherb

    wilfbiffherb Member

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    Bronica SQ-A is quite cheap but p there with mamiya and hasselblad. you can get multiple backs so you can shoot different films in the same session, different viewfinders, different lenses etc. a great kit camera.
     
  4. Richard S. (rich815)

    Richard S. (rich815) Subscriber

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    Rolleiflex SL66
     
  5. Richard S. (rich815)

    Richard S. (rich815) Subscriber

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  6. Nick Merritt

    Nick Merritt Member

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    Get a Rolleiflex and the Rolleinar closeup lenses (Rolleinar 3 gives the tightest closeup).
     
  7. ntenny

    ntenny Member

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    Or maybe a Rolleicord or Yashica first, to experiment with macro in the TLR form factor and decide whether a separate SLR is necessary. I think it really depends on shooting style---once on, the Rolleinaer sets are trivial to use, but if you switch back and forth between macro and other shots frequently, it could get kind of annoying to have to keep popping two auxiliary lenses on and off.

    -NT
     
  8. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

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    Every camera will have its own set of options, limitations, and ways of merging the two. Close up lenses (i.e. Rolleinar) can be fitted to just about anything, but the image qualiy may be a little less than using a prime lens with bellows focusing or extension tubes. For working very close with TLRs, you have parallax to contend with but dealing with it is not especially difficult, and doesn't require additional gadgets, though they do make life easier.
    Then there is cost, both of the camera and the collection of accessories you'd aquire to make do what you want.

    Only you can decide which trade-offs are important.
     
  9. TheFlyingCamera

    TheFlyingCamera Membership Council Council

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    Another vote for a Rolleiflex with Rolleinars. A Rolleinar 2 will get you about 1/2 life size.
    [​IMG]
     
  10. jernejk

    jernejk Member

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    Beautiful, thank you.
     
  11. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

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    Hasselblad (perhaps a 500C).
     
  12. k.hendrik

    k.hendrik Subscriber

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    Start with a C330f or s, 80+135mm: CHEAP lenses,parts, everything, CLD(you can do it yourself) & then Rolleiflex SL66se. I'd to wait 3 years before this last baby came by! EXPENSIVE ! parts,lenses, everything, CLD(you can't do anything yourself, don't even touch it !) . http://www.apug.org/gallery1/showimage.php?i=64689&catid=member&imageuser=26518 , http://www.apug.org/gallery1/showimage.php?i=64567&catid=member&imageuser=26518 , http://www.apug.org/gallery1/showimage.php?i=69718&catid=member&imageuser=26518 , http://www.apug.org/gallery1/showimage.php?i=69400&catid=member&imageuser=26518. But why my dear TS won't you go for the best of both worlds ? Mamiya RZ67 pro ii ! With a marker you draw a cm. less in the viewer and there you are 6x6 :smile: no landscape or portrait changes for you! With all the lenses/parts/macro/backs (digital too!) or whatever your weary hart could wish for ! And prices are a shame :smile: Happy searching.

    k.hendrik
     
  13. Richard S. (rich815)

    Richard S. (rich815) Subscriber

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    That will work great for closer portraits and such but not true macro. If macro is a top priority then a TLR is not what he wants. I have nothing against TLRs, I love them and own many but they are not the right tool for macro work.
     
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  15. Alan Gales

    Alan Gales Member

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    My favorite medium format camera that I have owned is my Hasselblad 500cm but for portraiture I favored the RZ67 that I used to own. With it's bellows focussing you can focus really close and Mamiya also offers extension tubes for it. I realize it's not square like you asked.

    The Rollie SL66 is a very fine camera. It also has bellows focussing like the Mamiya RZ and is square format like the Hasselblad. It is also expensive like Hasselblad. A very good friend of mine has one and loves it. The only problem is that it is getting harder and harder to find parts for these cameras or so my friend tells me. It would be something to look into before purchasing one.
     
  16. Noble

    Noble Member

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    An SLR is a natural choice for macro work.

    TLR can be smaller and lighter but I would not necessarily say they are more convenient. You can't change lenses on most of them. There is no autofocus or built in metering. There are no motor drives. Frankly they are quite restrictive in comparison to SLRs. I am not the kind of person that likes to fiddle with knobs and levers. With some medium format SLRs all you have to do is turn them on, focus, and shoot. The camera takes care of the rest. If you want more control you can set the aperture.

    To be honest your criteria are not all that restrictive. Any number of camera systems would work for you. The only recommendation I can come up with is SLR because of the Macro work.

    His enlarger only works up to 6x6.

     
  17. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    I would suggest 2 cameras.

    A TLR for general purpose work, including some macro work, plus an SLR oriented toward macro.

    A Mamiya C series TLR with a 65mm and 135mm lens set will do most of the work. If you add a paramender, it works well for close focus up to about 0.8 life size (with the 65mm lens).

    6x6 in the SLR world means, most likely, either Hasselblad or Bronica. It will cost you a bit to outfit them for macro work, but they are wonderful cameras. Hasselblad will most likekly be serviceable for longer.

    If you consider 645, that would expand your SLR choices to Mamiya, Pentax or Contax. Mamiya or Pentax can be had fairly inexpensively with close focus lenses + extension tubes.

    If you expand your choice to 6x7, the Mamiya RB67 is cheap, easy to use and has built in close focus capabilities with most lenses. It is very big, however.

    I am a Mamiya user - C330 TLR, 645 Pro and RB67.

    The attached was shot with the RB67 and the 140mm macro lens (+ the #1 extension tube - maybe :smile:). The non-macro lenses like the 65mm or 90mm will give you higher magnifications, at the expense of some flat-field performance.
     

    Attached Files:

  18. elekm

    elekm Member

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    I'd also go for the two camera approach. Actually, three cameras.

    1) Folding camera for landscapes, street work and occasional portraits. Very portable.

    2) TLR for street work and portraits and landscapes. Sort of portable, depending on which camera you buy.

    3) SLR for macro work, portraits and landscapes. Not as portable and probably not the best choice for street work.
     
  19. flash26c

    flash26c Member

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  20. k.hendrik

    k.hendrik Subscriber

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    So what; my Opemus meopta III accepts 6x7, 6x9,6x12, 6x400 the film slide goes only up to 6x6, so you have to make the same crop you did in your RZ67 viewer: 6x6 :smile:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 12, 2013
  21. thegman

    thegman Member

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    I use a Rollei TLR, but if you want macro, get an SLR. I know you can get the bits and bobs, and they're actually pretty nice, but an SLR is very much the best choice I think. I like Hasselblad, but looking at the SL66, I'd be very tempted with that.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 12, 2013
  22. jernejk

    jernejk Member

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    To tell you the truth, I'm leaning towards Hasselblad. The reason is probably as much emotional as it is rational.
    First, I really like it - it really has a unique aesthetics. Second, there should be no problem finding parts for quite some time in the future. And third, the price is not much higher compared to other systems. I mean, you can get a Hasselblad - A Hasselblad for less than Canon 10-22 digital only lens that's not even L quality!?
     
  23. Noble

    Noble Member

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    If you already settled on a Hasselblad and a big part of your decision was based on "aesthetics" why did you start this thread? I mean what are we supposed to say? If you like a camera because of it's aesthetics what if we all think it is ugly? Would you change your mind and choose a different camera? That wouldn't make any sense. If you like the way a Hasselblad looks and it makes you happy then just buy it. I'm just glad you didn't waste our time listing a bunch of non existent objective "facts" to support a decision that had a large emotional component.

    Enjoy your Hasselblad and let us know how it works out for you.
     
  24. Vaughn

    Vaughn Subscriber

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    Relax, Mr.Noble

    After 2 pages of advice he is leaning towards the Blad...even taking your advice with a SLR. Is he suppose to wait until he gets 1000 replies?LOL!

    Nice thing about a Blad in good condition, it can easily be resold if it does not fit one's requirements.
     
  25. jernejk

    jernejk Member

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    I am considering all proposed options and checking ebay. It seems either Bronica, Hasselblad or even SL66 would fit my needs. I have no distinct favorite, but as I'm going through listings, yes, Hasselblad seems to touch me stronger as the others. Hence, I'm leaning towards... but all options are still there.

    I find much, much more listings for Hassleblad systems or parts compared to the other two - which mens Hasselblad is probably the most future proof investment (at least on EU market). Also, as lovely camera as SL66 is, I do some flash photography and most lenses don't have leaf shutter, limiting sync speed to 1/30.
     
  26. LJSLATER

    LJSLATER Member

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    To me, the ultimate medium format camera is the Ebony 23S. More realistically, there's always the Horseman VHR, or the Shen-Hao TFC69-A (or any 4x5 with a roll film holder).

    Just throwin' it out there.