Thinking out aloud ..... thoughts welcome

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by TPPhotog, May 14, 2005.

  1. TPPhotog

    TPPhotog Member

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    Please excuse me for thinking out aloud and please feel free to offer your thoughts.

    When I first came to APUG I was a dedicated SLR shooter, after eventually working my way up to a Nikon F100.

    Since being here I seem to have gathered a collection of "classic" cameras and got the taste for becoming increasingly in control of what and how I shoot. I've found that a little Centon K100 with an old Pentax lens is giving me all I want from an SLR and it's fully manual. The Pentax glass gives me sharp contrasty images which meet my tastes.

    I've also fallen in love with the Canonet RF I picked up the other week. I find not only do I again have full manual control over my pictures, but I can handhold down to 1/15th sec, move around the streets without people asking me if I'm from the paper and is there anything exciting going on. In fact I've only been approached once and that was by a guy who recognised my new beastie as a Canonet.

    So now to the problem, I have a near (if not completely) mint Nikon F100 sitting in the cupboard not being used. I know it's an amazing camera and has opened doors in the past as the police see it and wave me through at some events. It's sitting there if I feel I need a real workhorse, but that's the real problem. It's sitting there doing nothing on the off chance I might find a use for it.

    So do I keep it or is it time to sell it to a new home where it will be lovingly exercised?

    Ho hum ..... why can't life be simple
    :confused:
     
  2. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    If it gets you into interesting venues, then wear it around your neck as your "press pass" and shoot with the Canonet in your pocket. Weegee said to carry a big camera like a Speed Graphic, and the police will usually let you in, but don't wear your press pass in your hatband--that's just in the movies.
     
  3. TPPhotog

    TPPhotog Member

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    That's an interesting thought David, shame about the pass in the hat though as I usually wear a Fedora.
     
  4. Carol

    Carol Member

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    I hope you keep the Nikon. You know how life is, as soon as you part with it a situation will arise that will have you wishing to still had it. You have a lifetime of photography ahead of you and who knows where it will take you.

    Chuckle. I could just be jealous as I use two old Ricoh's. I like manual cameras because they make me stop and think and heaven knows I need that.
     
  5. TPPhotog

    TPPhotog Member

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    Carol having to stop and think has always been my weakness. It's probably the biggest thing I'll still have to remember in the future :smile:
     
  6. John Bartley

    John Bartley Member

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    I guess I'd look at it in a "balance sheet" sort of way :::

    Does it take up space that you "need"? Will it sell for an decent amount of money? Do you "need" the money? Does it have sentimental value? Might you have a "use" for it in the future?

    If the possibility of "use" and the "sentimental value" are worth more than the "space" and the "cash", then you keep it.

    Otherwise......."for sale"

    just my $0.02
     
  7. TPPhotog

    TPPhotog Member

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    That's some of the things that makes it harder John, lets see:

    Does it take up space that you "need"? Nope
    Will it sell for an decent amount of money? I'd take a loss but what I got could buy other photography gear.
    Do you "need" the money? Nope don't really need it but see last answer.
    Does it have sentimental value? Narrr it's not a classic but it is pretty.
    Might you have a "use" for it in the future? That's the tricky one, will it rain tomorrow?
     
  8. Dave Miller

    Dave Miller Member

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    I think you should go back to your question and start afresh. Second sentence – replace “up” with “down” and rethink the problem.
    Joking aside two things have rekindled my photographic interest in the last year. The first was ditching digital printing, and opening my darkroom (does that count as two?) The second was changing from a 35mm EOS system to a manual TLR – a Mamiya 330s. I’m starting to create again: instead of just snap. Maybe you have started on the same journey?
     
  9. SuzanneR

    SuzanneR Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Shortly before I found APUG, I had added a medium format rangefinder to my small collection of cameras. I had been using an F100, which as you say, is a good workhorse. I found the Mamiya so much easier to use, just the F-stop and shutter speed to set... not hundreds of modes in the LCD window. It was freeing in a way, and was a real shot in the arm creatively speaking. I liked the rangefinder so much, that I found an old Leica... really love that! The F100 is used much less.

    That said, it always rains, and I rarely give up camera gear. Plus, I think it's way easier to use with flash, if I ever need to, than the other two cameras. And if speed is of the essence... well 'nough said.

    I'd hold onto it.
     
  10. John Bartley

    John Bartley Member

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    Ahhh This is so hard - I sympathise sooo much. I wish I lived in a 10,000 ft' house instead of 1000 ft' and then I'd never have to sell anything either. I've sold or given away almost 1/2 :sad: my antique radio collection recently anticipating a move in a few years :smile:. The plus side is that I've changed the nature of the collection now by stripping out the lesser quality or lesser "sentimentally" valued units and as a result the rest now seem much more dear.

    Anyway, I digress (as always :smile:)

    Based on a couple of your answers : don't need the money, has no sentimental value and don't need the space so you could buy other photo gear, here's my advice :

    Sell it and buy something else that will light your fire for while. When you get tired of that one - sell it also and go on to something else. The up side to doing this is that it's always "fresh" and you're always learning about something new.

    just more of my $0.02 worth of buttinski :smile:
     
  11. Lee Shively

    Lee Shively Member

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    Nearly everytime I sold a piece of photo equipment, I regretted it later.

    Most of the time, I later bought nearly identical equipment due to those regrets.

    That's my only words of wisdom.
     
  12. TPPhotog

    TPPhotog Member

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    I'm glad I posted now as there's all sorts of things that had escaped my "analysis" of this one.

    David I'd count that as 2 and in a way your jest could be true. With the F100 I can capture an event easier but on the other hand I'm less creative. Sounds like we maybe walking the same path, it's a shame I'm not working and living up there in Middle England anymore (well as far as it would be nice to meet up for a drink and see your prints in real life, I prefer everyday life here at home though).

    Suzanne it is the best camera I've ever used for speed and flash, especially with the SB-28 fitted. Up side is occasionally use flash, downside is that I hate using it if I can get away without it.

    John again many good points and don't worry about digressing it was interesting.

    Lee I did that when I moved from the Pentax LX to Nikon thinking I needed it. Dam I miss that beastie and not seen one in as good a condition ever since that didn't have a huge price tag.

    I think with many of us we go through so many thoughts before buying a camera that when our needs and usage change it's difficult to decide if our purchase is still valid. Certainly the creative part is very important and that is one thing that I don't feel with the F100. Too many options and manual focus isn't always easy with those metering "target" in the field of view.
     
  13. Mongo

    Mongo Member

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    One other data point to keep in mind: The F100 probably hasn't lost all of its value yet. If you sell it now and regret it, you'll probably be able to buy another in three years for less money. At least, I think so...
     
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  15. Bob F.

    Bob F. Member

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    I'm sorry? People SELL their camera equipment??? I mean, I know I've bought plenty of used stuff, but I always assumed the previous owner must have died or summut... You mean actual LIVING people actually SELL their OWN actual CAMERAS? Actually???


    Nahhhhh!?!? That's just too weird...


    Bob.

    P.S. I think you get my drift: keep it; keep it ALL! (exits stage left, pulling cloak over shoulder and cackling to himself).
     
  16. TPPhotog

    TPPhotog Member

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    Mongo that is very true or there again they may hold as more people come back to quality analog. Either way the door opens both ways I guess.

    Bob some of us are walking dead, especially after we just got back from a 23 hour sleep-over shift (there's a contradiction in terms for the name of a shift)
     
  17. BWGirl

    BWGirl Member

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    Tony, there is a very simple answer to this problem....

    cameras are like shoes (well.. except without the heels and pointy toes and...) anyway,... you cannot have too many, can you?? :wink:
     
  18. Earl Dunbar

    Earl Dunbar Member

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    Tony: I appreciate your quandary... it's one I shall face in the future. I have a stable of Olympus OM equipment. I have started my daughter off with an OM-2/50mm f1.8 as a basic kit, based partially on the fact that I can give her surplus or duplicate lenses and accessories, and am very informed on the OM's use, etc. Granted, the OMs are more like your Centon/Pentax combo than a Nikon F100... I hate LCD screens, menus, etc.

    But I have fallen in love with RFs, both fixed lens and interchangeable. I don't have any of the latter ... used to own Leica M3, but am now longing for the new Ziess and Zeiss M mount lenses.

    Since the Chief Domestic Officer would be quite unhappy if I did not unload some equipment before going on a buying spree, I am contemplating having to sell some OM gear (which I've owned since the mid-70s when the OM-1 was new to the scene) and concentrate on RFs and my 4x5. Aaaargh.

    You don't seem to have such constraints nor emotional attachment to the Nikon. If it were me I would sell because then you would not even have it to fall back on, thus perhaps "forcing" the use of the other cameras which seem to be driving your creativity.

    Earl
     
  19. anyte

    anyte Member

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    I'm replying without reading comments, so I apologize if you've made a decision or I'm just repeating what's already been said.

    Things to consider:

    How long have you had it and when did you last use it? Relatively speaking, is this a long time or have you left a camera to sit in the past and then gone back to it down the road? What are your photography goals and will they perhaps change so that you might want to use the Nikon again.

    Perhaps it's best to wait until the honeymoon with the new camera is over and see how you feel then.
     
  20. TPPhotog

    TPPhotog Member

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    Jeanette I have a pair with heels and pointy toes but I got them when they were new and not "retro" LOL

    Earl interesting as I guess there could be some guilt here that I'm building a collection without unloading stuff I don't actually use.

    Annette more interesting and relevant points, don't worry some of them have not already been mentioned.

    Thank you everyone for your thoughts, I'm thinking about them as I'm hiding away in the darkroom :D
     
  21. rbarker

    rbarker Member

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    Simple. Keep the F100. You'll eventually get back to doing the style of work for which it is the better tool.
     
  22. gareth harper

    gareth harper Inactive

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    I think David said it right at the start.
    Keep the big Nikon for when you need that press pass. Nothing like a big full dress SLR, complete with massive f2.8 zoom, lens hood and big flash gun for getting waived through. Also SLR's with motor winds are great for fast moving action. Also people react to camera, sometimes a little rangefinder gives the the reaction you want (usually none) other times it's that big SLR.

    Horses for courses, plus film camera prices are plumeting (in the UK anyway) not a good time to sell.
     
  23. BradS

    BradS Subscriber

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    Tough call. I have read everybody else's posting and pretty much agree with all of them - this, despite them representing both sides of the issue.

    I've bought and sold, lost or broken more cameras than I care to remember...

    alas, I can offer no advice - only sympathy/empathy.


    OTOH....you might try this: Sell the gear to a trusted friend, cheap. Your friend will invariably let you borrow the camera anytime you need / want to. You get the cash, and still get to use it once in a while.....
     
  24. BradS

    BradS Subscriber

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    another idea....

    could you lease it out? Your investment generates some income, gets used and you still maintain ownership.
     
  25. TPPhotog

    TPPhotog Member

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    Many thanks for your thoughts and suggestions everyone. It's been an enlightening thread which has given me a lot more data to work with. My decision is that I will keep it for another few months and see if I have a need of it over the rest of this year. If not for actual use it does make a great "press pass" and I could always have it loaded with colour film just in case :wink:
     
  26. Dave Miller

    Dave Miller Member

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    Colour film! What's that?