This era's Portriga equivalent?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by eric, Feb 28, 2005.

  1. eric

    eric Member

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    I'm home today nursing a sick kid. So in between cycles, I'm scanning some old portriga prints (my original project when I got this scanner 3-4 years ago!).

    What is today's equivalent?

    Also, anyone use that charcoal finish on Luminos? My local pusher has some on sale.
     
  2. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Charcoal R is interesting stuff, but it's not Portriga. I tried some and I found there was a really narrow range between too flat and too contrasty. I love the surface, which is like watercolor paper. I think that if you used it for a while and targeted negatives specifically to it, it would be an interesting paper to use.
     
  3. eric

    eric Member

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    Can you give an example as to what kind of negs? I don't have a densinometer and I don't really understand any of that. I need help like "a little over or a little under" in terms of negs.
     
  4. jim appleyard

    jim appleyard Member

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    I found the same. It took quite a few test strips from each neg to get it right. Portriga, no, but the Charcoal R is nice paper.
     
  5. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    I didn't test it enough to really decide, but my instinct would be that a slightly flatter neg might do better on Charcoal R. Maybe reduce processing time 10% as a starting point.