Tiffen 87 IR filter

Discussion in 'Alternative Processes' started by Silver Halide / Zone, Dec 29, 2013.

  1. Silver Halide / Zone

    Silver Halide / Zone Subscriber

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    Hi All

    I recently purchased one of these filters based on some of the IR photo results I saw. I now have it in my possession, but have not used it yet. The filter is completely black, I can see zero visible light coming through. I have no idea how I should expose the film using this filter, can anyone help me out.

    Thanks

    Marc
     
  2. whlogan

    whlogan Subscriber

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    It's OK ... Go with it. USE some Rollei IR FILM AT AN ISO OF 3 AND YOU WILL BE FINE, NO FOOLIN... SEEMS STRANGE, BUT IS OK really seems strange. But it s the way IR is...bgo with it... new keyboard.... sorry
    Logan
     
  3. DWThomas

    DWThomas Subscriber

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    Info I dug out a couple years ago indicates the Tiffen 87 is a 770nm cut-off. With the IR film that's left, that will require more exposure time than with the 720nm (R72, etc.) cutoff that seems most common today. But looking black is the norm for IR filters, the sensitivity of the eye doesn't extend that far. Unfortunately, many of the IR filters that were used decades ago even look a trifle black to the "IR" films of today.

    I advise "bracket, bracket, bracket." It is also a good idea when starting out with IR film to take at least one shot on the roll without a filter, metered for the unfiltered ISO. That gives a check on the processing independent of the IR filtering and compensation.
     
  4. Andrew O'Neill

    Andrew O'Neill Subscriber

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    I have the same filter, but Wratten version. It's supposed to be like that. Hold it up to a bright light source and you'll see the light. The factor seems to be about 16x (4 stops), at least that's what I use with Efke IR. Which film are you using?