tmax first developer question

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by danzyc, Aug 24, 2007.

  1. danzyc

    danzyc Member

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    hello the tmax first develepor of the slide kit is the same that a tmax developer
    for negative?

    thanks
     
  2. Tom Hoskinson

    Tom Hoskinson Member

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    Kodak TMax Developer for reversal processing

    Several workers have reported that Kodak's standard TMax Developer product (for negative development) works ok as both the first and second developer in B&W film reversal processing.

    HC110 is also used by a number of workers, as is Dektol and the Ilford PQ paper developers. Rodinal is also used by some workers.

    See: http://photo.net/bboard/q-and-a-fetch-msg?msg_id=007K4f

    TMax Developer, HC110 and Rodinal are all concentrated stock solutions that have the attribute of a long shelf life.
     
  3. danzyc

    danzyc Member

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    should i use tmax developer full strenght? or as manual describe 1+4?

    thanks
     
  4. Tom Hoskinson

    Tom Hoskinson Member

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    I would try it at 1+4. You may decide to try a stronger or weaker dilution based on your 1+4 results.
     
  5. danzyc

    danzyc Member

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    tom if i bleach for a long time would have more contrasty image?

    i normally bleach my trix reversal for 4 minutes.....
     
  6. Tom Hoskinson

    Tom Hoskinson Member

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    Bleach and redevelopment in reversal processing

    The purpose of the bleach step is to remove ALL OF THE EXPOSED SILVER - which has been developed by the first developer.

    So, you need to bleach only for a sufficient amount of time to remove all of the exposed silver.

    After bleaching, the remaining unexposed silver is then fogged (either light fogged or chemically fogged) to form the positive image - which must then be developed (second developer).

    To increase the contrast of the positive image, use a second developer like Kodak D-19 and/or increase the second development time.

    See: http://www.silverprint.co.uk/PDF/reversal_web.pdf

    Also See: http://home.snafu.de/jens.osbahr/photography/reversal_processing/osbahr_reversal.pdf
     
  7. Alessandro Serrao

    Alessandro Serrao Member

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    I think the contrast can be manipulated only by lenghtening the first developer time 'cause the second development is done to completion only.

    For this purpose I feel 1+4 TMax dev is way too diluited as the first dev.
    You maybe can use it as the second dev but with a 1+2 diluition or something alike.
     
  8. Tom Hoskinson

    Tom Hoskinson Member

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    Many workers use Kodak D-19 (undiluted) as BOTH the first developer AND the second developer.

    The silver that is developed by the first developer will all be bleached out in the bleach step.

    The remaining silver (unexposed and undeveloped) is then either given a fogging exposure or is chemically fogged. The fogged silver is then developed by the second developer.