TMY in Tmax-RS on Jobo Help!!

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Donsta, Feb 3, 2005.

  1. Donsta

    Donsta Member

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    I currently shoot TMX in all formats with the zone system and my tested times and EI in Tmax RS on a Jobo. I am very satisfied with my results and the process, but ocassionally I yearn for some speed (I'm shooting the TMX at 64 for N). I'm not keen to go through days of testing for infrequent use: has anyone done the homework? If so, would you be willing to share your times, EI etc. ?
     
  2. djklmnop

    djklmnop Member

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    What format are you shooting? 35mm, 120, and 4x5 have different film bases which will invariably effect EI and development time. I tested 35mm and 120 and they are pretty close, with 120 requiring a bit more time.

    TMY:
    EI: 250, Tmax RS 1:9 @ 75F for 8.5 - 9 min. 240ml 1500 series tank.
     
  3. Donsta

    Donsta Member

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    I shoot mostly 120 and 4X5 (a little 8X10). With TMX I find no difference between roll and sheet films. Obviously I will do a little testing, but it would be great tp have a sensible starting point.

    By the way, this question prompted a member, Michael Scarpitti, to send me this PM:

    " What?

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    What are you talking about?

    B&W should NEVER be processed in a rotary processor. NEVER.

    The contrast gets too high and the speed too low.

    Hand-processing is the ONLY acceptable method for 35mm work.

    Also, the zs is nothing but a fraud.

    TMY is horrible for outdoor work.

    In other words, everything you're doing is wrong."
     
  4. roteague

    roteague Member

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    Ignore him; he seems to popup occasionally to criticize and question other people's intelligence.
     
  5. djklmnop

    djklmnop Member

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    Yeah, throw everything you know about shutter and aperture out the window too.. God some people have nothing better to do with their time.
     
  6. roteague

    roteague Member

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    I actually got a response from MS thanking me, perhaps tongue-in-cheek I suppose, for my post. I didn't have the heart to tell him that I am planning on buying a Jobo CPP-2 so I can process Efke at home ... uh oh, I think I just told him. I guess it it time to blow the dust off my old "Zone System for All Formats" book.

    BTW, are you using the Expert Drums? I would like to find out more about them.
     
  7. Donsta

    Donsta Member

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    I use the expert drums and can highly recommend them. I have never seen any indication of uneven agitation. They are expensive, but work just fine and produce perfect results. I went for a mechanized process so I could be sure to have an absolutely consistent process. The fact that temperature control is also perfect helps this cause. I have been using a Jobo for many years now and I am extremely impressed with the product.
     
  8. roteague

    roteague Member

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    Great. I used to have a Jobo CPE - which I owned for many years - but it got stolen a few years ago. I was considering replacing it with another CPE, but once I read about the Expert Tanks I started considering the CPP-2 instead; even though it is much more expensive. The plan is to use it for developing B&W as well as E6 (if I can get the chemicals here).
     
  9. Donsta

    Donsta Member

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    I actually prefer the 2500 tanks for E6 - I find that the expert drums tend to make E6 films curl quite a bit - I don't have any problems with B&W films though.
     
  10. roteague

    roteague Member

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    Thanks, I'll remember that. I actually still have some 2500 tanks, as well as the 4x5 reels and loader.