to JOBO or not to JOBO

Discussion in 'Enlarging' started by zuck kovak, Oct 27, 2006.

  1. zuck kovak

    zuck kovak Member

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    I am just about to take the plunge into 8x10 photography and have an important question about processing film.

    I have been shooting 4x5 and using a CombiPlan for developing film with good results. 8x10 is either tray processing or JOBO CPP2 with 3000 series Expert drum. I am leaning toward spending the cash for the JOBO solution because I like the fact that I can develop 6 sheets at a time like with the CombiPlan and that the temperature is kept constant and the development is very accurate and no chemicals to soak fingers in.

    However I have also heard and read that some people do not recommend the JOBO because its agitation is constant and thats not the best for the film development. I dont agitate much when I do my 4x5 stuff with the CombiPlan. First 30 seconds continuous and then one inversion every 30 sec. This is with ExactolLux a staining developer similar to Pyrocat. So i am worried that although the JOBO is very convinient the quality will suffer. Not what one wants after going through all the difficulties with shooting 8x10 instead of a smaller format.

    Can you guys share with me your experiences. Does tray processing give better results or there is no difference its just a matter of getting the development times adjusted to the JOBO.

    Thanks,

    Zuck
     
  2. Markok765

    Markok765 Member

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    The quality may suffer with staining developers and rodinal, but if you use a normal developer it should be fine
     
  3. Donsta

    Donsta Member

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    Don't know about Rodinal, but you can get outstanding results with Pyrocat HD on your Jobo (it was afterall, designed with rotary processing in mind) - you may need to do some testing to work out exactly how to set up your process. Possibly the only thing you won't so well on a Jobo is semi-stand for very substantial contrast contraction - that's sort of obvious though.

    I've used loads of different films in many different soups on my Jobo over the years - it's an awesome way to go and don't let anyone who hasn't invested some effort with one tell you differently - the consistency of process will improve whatever it is you are trying to do. If you want to completely take the pain out of getting the negatives you want, have a good look at BTZS combined with a Jobo.
     
  4. Jerry Basierbe

    Jerry Basierbe Member

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    I wouldn't worry too much about quality negatives using a Jobo. John Sexton and Howard Bond use them.

    Jerry
     
  5. Mark_S

    Mark_S Member

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    I use a Jobo for 4x5, using the 2800 series drums - allows me to do 12 sheets at a time. I have been happy with the results - I use mostly HC-110, and some of the times get short with dilution B, so I go to a more dilute developer and increase time.

    Things that you have to look out for:
    The jobo does a fantastic job of using very little chemistry - the downside of this is that with very dilute developers, you may exhaust the developer before you finish developing. Usually just using more chemical can fix this.

    Developers such as Pyro which oxidize rapidly may have issues because of the rapid agitation. I have had success using PMK Pyro with EDTA added to reduce the oxidation, but to get Pyro working in the Jobo was a frustrating thing.

    Things that I like about it are:
    I can process film in daylight (or darkroom light at least).
    I can process 120 and 4x5 at the same time (only done this once).
    I get very reproducible results.
    I can process E-6 in there, although most of what I do is B&W.
     
  6. galyons

    galyons Member

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    Staining developers formulated for rotary processing work extremely well. I have used a Jobo for several years. Would hate to go back to my other methods. Consistent results, lower chem and water usage are all huge benefits. I wonder if some of the comments are from folks who have any actual experience with the Jobo processors & expert drum.

    Cheers,
    Geary
     
  7. stormbytes

    stormbytes Member

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    I don't know much about staining developers, but being an avid user of Rodinal, I ran a test about a year or so ago to see if there's a difference in sharpness between negs processed in-Jobo and those processed in semi-stand. Needless to say, the Jobo has been packed away ever since.

    Good luck!
     
  8. Jim Noel

    Jim Noel Member

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    I have used rotary development most of the time for many years, first with a uniroller and drum, and for the past 15-20 years mostly a Jobo.
    If you want to try rotary development without the expense of a Jobo, look for a Uniroller, or other roller base which reverses, and a Chromega drum. These drums don't leak or depend on a gasket like the Uicolor drum.
    An 8x10 wil do one sheet, naturally, and a 16X20 will hold 4 sheets of 8x10. Only the amount of chemistry to fully develop the negative is needed so developer quantities are minimal.

    The system works very well. Sometimes I use it if only doing one or two sheets of 8x10 and don't wish to get the Jobo down off the shelf.

    Jim
     
  9. Bob Carnie

    Bob Carnie Subscriber

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    We have been using Jobo processing for hutchings PMK formula for over 10 years now with wonderful success.Rodinal works lovely too.
     
  10. Bob Carnie

    Bob Carnie Subscriber

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    Jim
    maybe you know the answer to this, I am trying to develop very large sheets of film 20inch by 30 inch , My Alt2300 system is not up to the task.
    you mention Uniroller and Chromega drums. are they able to go to these larger sizes with the reverse rotation.
    thanks
    Bob