Travel to China and South Korea

Discussion in 'Geographic Location' started by rthomas, May 11, 2011.

  1. rthomas

    rthomas Member

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    I have a couple of questions for the community regarding travel in Asia, in particular South Korea and China. I may soon be spending an extended period teaching abroad, and I'd like to take a reasonable 35mm camera kit as well as my Mac laptop and a couple hard drives. Having never been to the far east, I'm seeking opinions on what I can expect culturally - especially in terms of taking pictures - but also, what films might be available, and if I can expect to readily find internet connections in the major cities. I will probably bring a digital camera too, but I don't want to repeat what I did on my Costa Rica/Panama trip, i.e. I only shot five rolls of film.
     
  2. ann

    ann Subscriber

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    Be aware when flying Intra China flights, they are very strict about weight limits, and size of carrying on luggage. However, i have been told that a camera is considered a personal item and doesn't fall under the weight limit.

    You might want to do some research on this so you won't be surprised. I am off to China tomorrow and may have more (read better and personal first hand info about this at the end of the month)
     
  3. Mark Fisher

    Mark Fisher Subscriber

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    I wouldn't count on finding film when you need it. Memory cards are easy to find. Definitely check ahead of time. Internet is widely available so that really isn't a problem. I found people very welcoming and photography is not a problem. I was just in rural Yunnan province and I found that people actually seemed pleased that you'd want to take their picture or their child's picture. If there is one recommendation, I'd say try to get out of the cities and tourist areas and go places that few Westerner's go. The place we stayed at is called the Linden Centre which I'd recommend to anyone. Here are some images from near the Linden Centre. A really wonderful place for photographers.
     
  4. kwall

    kwall Member

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    This is a timely thread, as I'm getting on a plane Saturday for 16 days in Shanghai, which includes two full weekends. At least one of those weekends I want to take a tour into the countryside so I can get some pictures of more rural areas. Plenty to photography in the city, too, of course. I'll be taking my Nikon N90S, my Yashica Mat-124G, and half a dozen B&W films (each) in 35mm and 120 formats. I'm looking forward to working while I'm there, but I'm much more excited about the weekends. :D
     
  5. Colin Corneau

    Colin Corneau Subscriber

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    I find China way more accepting and open to photography than here. As in any venture, be respectful (you are in their country, after all) and you'll be fine. I've made 5 trips there and never had an issue once.
    I did use a Lonely Planet book to learn the Mandarin phrase for "May I take your photograph?" and that with some good humour seemed to open doors.

    Film is best if you bring it, but can be found in Beijing and Shanghai at the camera malls. Haven't seen the one in Shanghai but the one in Beijing is pretty amazing.

    Dont' forget a currency/voltage converter!
     
  6. sfjphotography

    sfjphotography Member

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    Sometimes I get dirty looks from the S Koreans riding my bike with my camera, which is one reason why I haven't tried to shoot them. Film in country is stupid expensive and hard to find unless you're in Seoul. Film processing even for C-41 is hard to find so plan on not processing anything until you return. I've been in the Gunsan area for almost a year now and have basically sort of given up. Mostly due to the fact that I don't care for urban shots much and rice fields are getting old. Guess I'm just burnt out.
     
  7. per volquartz

    per volquartz Member

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    In Shanghai...

    ... There are two camera marts. I have visited one on several occasions. Ilford film is readily available and some Fuji too.

    Enjoy China. Its an amazing place. You will most likely find people very friendly. Be courteous and show interest in Chinese culture and their life style and you will be amazed...

    Have a great trip!
     
  8. ann

    ann Subscriber

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    I have found the Chinese people very friendly and willing to have their picture taken, in fact they many times wanted to take mine.

    I sometimes point at them and then at the camera, and they understand I am asking permission, sometimes i just shoot, and when they see me i give them a thumbs up which is generally returned.

    The children are real hams, but love to give the V signal, which is important to them but I would rather they didn't
     
  9. heespharm

    heespharm Member

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    If u take any pictures in Korea and they of a sensitive nature (demilitarized zone) u may get your film confiscated at the camera shop... My buddy is military and took pictures in the meeting bunker in the demilitarized zone.... Let's just say they weren't happy and he never saw the pics again