Traveling with Efke 820 Infrared film

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Robert Ley, Sep 26, 2012.

  1. Robert Ley

    Robert Ley Subscriber

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    I am planning on traveling with the above film along with other films and going through Airport x-ray machines. I have traveled before with film in the US and had no problems but was wondering if the Efke 820 presented any special problems. My feeling is that it would not, considering how slow this film is, but wanted to know if any one here had any experience.
     
  2. AgX

    AgX Member

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    For X-radiation issues not the speed used for imaging (IR in this case) is of interest but it's spectrally unsensitized speed.

    Typically spectral und unsensitized speed go alongside. In your case, with the necessary filtration, the useful speed is relative low, but that does not mean it is low concerning X-Ray.
    Without filtration it would be 400 ISO, use this as guide concerning X-ray susceptibility.
     
  3. SMBooth

    SMBooth Member

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    I think I would be more concerned with heat then X-ray with IR film, try and keep it cool while traveling if your not using or processing in a timely manner.
     
  4. ntenny

    ntenny Member

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    I've put it through carry-on X-rays in the US and Europe quite a number of times without a problem. That doesn't mean it *can't* happen, but in my experience it doesn't. Note that this refers, as usual, to CARRY-ON X-rays only---the checked baggage X-rays will definitely ruin film.

    It seems to be light-leak-prone in 120. I don't think it's any more heat-sensitive than other films, but it's hard to tell because field conditions are often hot and bright at the same time.

    -NT