Tri-X at 1600? Actually, yeah...surprisingly good

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by summicron1, Jan 11, 2014.

  1. summicron1

    summicron1 Subscriber

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    I've been experimenting recently with pushing tri-x to 1600, developed in d-76, 1:1, at 68 degrees for 12.5 minutes, exactly what Kodak recommends, and have been pleasantly surprised with the results -- not grainy at all, even at 11 by 14 from a 35mm negative.

    Really a vast improvement from what it was like the last time I tried that, somewhere back in the 70s.

    This is a typical example -- the actual print has slightly better tonal range...i have a rather cheap scanner.

    alice is 32.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 12, 2014
  2. RattyMouse

    RattyMouse Subscriber

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    Are you developing with 1:1?
     
  3. clayne

    clayne Member

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    It's not really going to get massively grainier, it's usually just going to get contrastier as shadow detail is lost. Thing is, sometimes this is perfectly fine and acceptable for the given type of photograph.

    400TX can be pushed to 3200 as well. Best results found with XTOL 1+1 by far; but D-76 is no slouch.
     
  4. summicron1

    summicron1 Subscriber

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    yes, 1:1 --- i notice the highlights seem brighter. I wouldn't use this for everything, obviously, but for interiors on these dark winter nights it's handy .... or for using my older slower lenses.

    i was actually quite impressed with how well it held mid-tonal range stuff.
     
  5. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    I think it looks good.

    Jeff
     
  6. momus

    momus Member

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    I'm constantly amazed at how well that film performs at most any ISO and in most any developer (although D76 is my favorite). On the other end, I sometimes shoot it at 100 or even 50 ISO and develop in D76 and it looks just great.
     
  7. RattyMouse

    RattyMouse Subscriber

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    Anyone tri HP5 like this? How does it compare to the Kodak?
     
  8. presspass

    presspass Member

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    I would also like to know how well HP5 works at 1600 and 3200 with D-76. Anyone?
     
  9. ME Super

    ME Super Member

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    HP5+ reportedly pushes well all the way to 3200. I actually like HP5+ slightly better than Tri-X for black and white photography.
     
  10. effae

    effae Member

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    Nice post, I've recently shot a roll of tri-x @ 1600, and was contemplating on how to approach the development. This gave me confidence to start out with the recommended times by kodak!
     
  11. summicron1

    summicron1 Subscriber

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    I had, as i said, excellent results with 1:1 D-76 for 12.5 minutes at 68 degrees, precisely what the instructions said to do.