Tripod recommandation for Rolleiflex.

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by Hamster, Dec 10, 2008.

  1. Hamster

    Hamster Member

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    I broke my last Rollei beyond repair because I was using a flimsy tripod with a poorly designed quick release plate. The Rollei lost its balance and fell off the windowsill. My bad, very expensive mistake.

    After saving for 2 years I have a Rollei again, this time a MX-EVS, an upgrade from my previous Automat2.

    Now that I have been burnt once the first asscessorie I got was a beat up rolleifix, however I am lost as to what kind of Tripod I should get.

    I am 6ft3in tall do mostly potrait stuff. Can anyone recommand me a tripod that is a good comprimise between price and safety? Also I use an array of Vivitar 283 the I got for cheap as my flash setup. Is there anyway to combine the tripod/flash/rollei setup together?
     
  2. dpurdy

    dpurdy Member

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    There is a really good tripod that used to be made by Rollei but you have to watch for it on ebay where they sell really cheap. It is my favorite tripod with a gitzo ball head on top. Remember if you don't use the prism you don't really need a full height tripod. I use the prism though so I like a tripod that goes up nearly 6 feet.

    Just be careful with the Rolleifix. I hate the Rolleifix. It is very easy to put the camera on it and not have it quite seated right and you turn around and the camera falls off the top of your tripod. I did that at the beach and it fell into the sand.

    Also it is nearly impossible to use the Rolleifix without scratching up the bottom of the front plate on your camera. You have to be very careful and make certain to get the Rolleifix nubs up into the sockets for them on the camera. I decided to get a Rolleifix especially for a trip and the very first thing I did the very first time I put my camera on it was to put two ugly scratches on the bottom of the camera.

    I prefer the bogen hex plate. I use the large 4 inch one that allows all four feet on the bottom of the Rollei to sit on the plate and give you great stability. It is very quick and easy to take the plate off to change film and then put it back on to go on the tripod. The bogen hex plate snaps into the holder very solid. I use the same type 4 inch plate for my 8x10 camera as well.

    I have used the Vivitar 283 and 285 many times with my Rollei. There is an inexpensive L bracket that holds the flash and has a tripod connection on the bottom. The flash bracket makes a really good handle to hold the Rollei and still allows you to focus. I find it easier than holding and focusing the camera without it. The problem with the L bracket is that the tripod connection on the bottom sticks out and will not allow you to sit the camera down except on it's back.

    Dennis
     
  3. Vaughn

    Vaughn Subscriber

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    I have always considered Bogens to be a good value -- with your height (same as mine) I would go with the next size up from the 3001 (3021? -- they have changed the model numbers)...or you might go with the same size Feisol pod from http://reallybigcameras.com/ .

    The MX-EVS was my first camera and I still use a Rollei TLR occasionally. I prefer a ballhead, so you might take a look at the ballheads at http://reallybigcameras.com/ also (Photo Clams). Ballheads just seem to work the best for me when using the waist-lever finder...they allow one to move the camera almost like there was no pod. (if that makes any sense!)

    I have no experience with the Rolleifix or with flash.
     
  4. jmcd

    jmcd Member

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    I actually love the Rolleifix, and recommend it. It stabilizes the entire camera and protects the back from being bent due to torquing the camera while it is being wound while mounted to a solid tripod. Of course, check that your camera is properly attached before letting go.
     
  5. Jeff L

    Jeff L Subscriber

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    I use a Manfrotto 055 with and 029 head. with my Rollei and other cameras. Quite sturdy.
     
  6. jovo

    jovo Membership Council Council

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    The Feisol 3301 has a max height of 72" (which is very close if not identical to the Bogen 3021). With a ballhead, which makes the most sense for a square format camera, you'll be quite well served especially if you aren't using a prism finder and have to look down. The Feisol is an exceptionally good value for a carbon fiber pod, and the light weight of a modest sized ball head makes the whole kit very, very convenient to schlep around.
     
  7. Allan Swindles

    Allan Swindles Member

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    The use of the Rolleifix is a 'must' when mounting the camera on a tripod. Franke & Heidecke were not stupid in designing such an item for all the reasons jmcd has said. Of course the camera has to be correctly seated and the clamp applied but then you wouldn't only half tighten the screw if mounting a camera directly on to the head would you? Another reason is that if the screw is too long it is possible that the camera back/base could be damaged or even perforated by the head of the screw if overtightened. This advice was passed on to me by an extremely knowledgeable Rollei repairman. As to tripods, I use a Manfrotto 055 with a 141? handles everywhere head. Not carbon fibre/graphite, that's for fly rods isn't it, but solid and very stable. The last thing you need is one which blows over in a breeze, or if you cough! To be fair, I have no experience of the forementioned type so perhaps it is unfair to pass comment, but I was brought up to believe that tripods have to be heavy - the weight difference doesn't seem that great anyway, at least compared to the price differencial.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 10, 2008
  8. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

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    This is all made even clearer when you try to mount a Yashica 124G to a tripod.
     
  9. dpurdy

    dpurdy Member

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  10. edtbjon

    edtbjon Member

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    I second the "vote" for Feisol. I use one 3401 with a CB-50 head for my Hasselblad and I'm very satisfied with it. Great value for money.
    In windy conditions, see to that the center column (if you want one) has a hook on the bottom of it, so that you can hang your bag (or whatever that weighs in at a few pounds) to weigh the whole setup down a bit. (This is where the 'blad is really excellent. I always carry a couple of extra magazines and a few lenses, so my bag is quite heavy, as compared to the light and flimsy 'flex, where you only carry some extra film. :smile: :smile: )

    //Björn
     
  11. Allan Swindles

    Allan Swindles Member

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    So, it is, as usual, each to their own. The whole idea of Q/R plates is that there is no need to carry a tripod mounted camera over the shoulder. The Rolleifix is well thought out. It has studs on the front to locate with the sockets on the camera front to clamp the unit, make it solid and eliminate any chance of back distortion. Any system which relies on only the screw thread to hold the camera becomes entirely dependant on the back closure catch and the back hinges.
     
  12. df cardwell

    df cardwell Subscriber

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  13. craigclu

    craigclu Subscriber

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    The model may be the 3011.... I used this small pod with success with an MXV many years back. Plenty of support but portable. I originally had the small 3025 head and then later, a medium-sized ballhead and they both work fine with the Rollei's. These cameras are so smooth and stable that they don't require much mass for control. I tend toward overkill on tripod sizes but in this case, the little 3011 is perfectly adequate.
     
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  15. Vaughn

    Vaughn Subscriber

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    Craig, I am not familiar with the 3011. The 3021 might be over-kill for a TLR...we use them for lightweight 4x5 set-ups (Horseman Woodfields w/ 150mm lens)...so the 3011 might be a better fit.

    Vaughn
     
  16. bowzart

    bowzart Member

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    I've got a Gitzo Reporter (its pretty old, but they may still be around). I also have the bogen 3021. Unless I'm using the 4x5, I use the gitzo. It is smaller, and very sturdy. One nice feature is that the legs can spread out farther to give a lower point of view, if necessary. I haven't got a ball head, but I believe they are available.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 11, 2008
  17. Ralph Javins

    Ralph Javins Member

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    OK, my little Siamese cat is snuggled against my side now, so I can type. At least he is no longer on the computer.

    For height and good stability (I am 6 feet 3 inches), I use a Bogen / Manfrotto 3036. It is very stable and quickly damps any vibration. The additional clamp knobs for the center column to tripod leg braces do add to the time for setup, but they also help with stability. Yes, it is heavier, but that is a major factor with the ability to damp vibration. It is my main tripod for my 35 mm, 2 & 1/4 Square, and 4 by 5 stuff. My old Davis and Sanford Model B is reserved for the 4 by 5 only.

    For portability with the 35 mm and 2 & 1/4 Square, I have a Bogen 3021-S. It can go inside the airline carry-on bag.

    It does seem that as with cameras, one size tripod (or camera format) may not be the best choice for every application. The optimum situation may be to have more than one. What do you want to do?
     
  18. dpurdy

    dpurdy Member

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    I am guessing I am not the only person here amassing enough tripods to start a used tripod store.
    I don't remember model numbers but I have a very heavy Gitzo with huge oversized wing nut type tighteners. I also have the largest Bogen I know of. Also the most common of Gitzo for 4x5, as well as the smaller of the zone 6 wooden tripods. Along with a tilt all and the Rollei tripod. And yet I still an thinking I need a carbon fiber manfrotto.
    Dennis
     
  19. Hamster

    Hamster Member

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    Thanks for the many reply.

    What I am needing is a general purpose setup that is good value for money. I had thought about Manfrotto 055 as it is widely available and easy to resell, but it felt cheap when I played with it in the store. I also saw a Gitzo reporter on ebay, seems solid enough, let hope it don;t get too expensive.

    Aside from the Rolleiflex. I also have a FED2 that I use occasionally hand held.

    Another question, Is it possible to use the Rolleifix by attacthing to the tripod without ballhead?
     
  20. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

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    Sure, but then you wouldn't have a very easy time leveling the camera. I do this with a monopod (Rolleifix to monopod with no head)... but that is easy to level.

    Re: your initial question - my set-up is Bogen/Manfrotto 3001 with 486 ballhead and Rolleifix.
     
  21. bowzart

    bowzart Member

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    Nobody's mentioned Ries. I've got one of those. A bit different to get used to. Wooden tripods are lighter than metal ones. Other ones from a bygone era, the Tiltall and it's cousin another aluminum the same as the Tiltall, called Star D.

    Tripod store, Dennis? I wish I had it in me to do something like that. Not just tripods, either. Its easy to bring stuff home, but awful hard to make it go the other way! I have a vast accumulation of those phony little tabletop tripods and cheap box camera ones made of sheet metal that I was picking up compulsively because I was using a pinhole camera design that really needed to be "low down".
     
  22. jeroldharter

    jeroldharter Member

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    Ditto.

    The Feisol is a great value and light as a feather.

    If you are less concerned about weight, then the Berlebach with 2 section legs and a leveling base is great and very quick to set up and level.
     
  23. Wilcoxson David L.

    Wilcoxson David L. Member

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    I have a Rolliflex 2.8C sans Rollifix that I mount on a Manfrotto/Bogan 3021 with a Bogan ball head that looks like some kind of joystick. I can't remember the model number. Anyway, the ball head has a rectangular quick release head. While using the Rolliflex, the tripod stays put where I plant it. I never move the tripod with the camera mounted precisely because I don't want to put undue stress on the camera back. I always carry the camera by it's strap around my neck. Come to think of it, I carry all my cameras this way. I never leave them mounted on the tripod while moving from place to place. I think it's safer that way.
     
  24. Hamster

    Hamster Member

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    The problem with square quick-release was that on my last rollei I had one of those. I left it on the windows sill and it lost its balance and fell over. Very sad a 60 yeat old camera is damaged beyond repair.

    This is why I went for the Rolleifix. So there is no temptation to leave the QR plate on.
     
  25. Rolleiflexible

    Rolleiflexible Member

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    I like the Gitzos. I keep my Tele on
    a Cremaillere 2 with a geared column,
    a No. 2 Gitzo pan/tilt head, and a
    Rolleifix. I wish only that the column
    were a few inches taller, when shooting
    six-foot-tall subjects.

    The milk crate is an essential part of
    this rig. It raises me up to the finder. :smile:
     
  26. Hamster

    Hamster Member

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    Finally I settled on a Gitzo Reporter, Novoflex MagicBall Mini, and a Rolleifix. All of it I got for fairly reasonable price on ebay. Will be using them next few weeks and see how they fare. Many thinks to everyone who made all the useful suggestions.