Trying to recreate output from inkjet using analogue process

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by wiggy, Dec 1, 2007.

  1. wiggy

    wiggy Member

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    I normally use my scanner and printer to proof stuff before wet printing. I've never really considered using the printer for B&W due to the slight sepia like cast I get from the way that it mixes inks to achieve greys. This time however, the effect perfectly suited the photo and I'd like to be able to recreate this in the darkroom as I would like to be able to have the effect on prints larger than A4 which is my printer's max.

    It isn't really sepia but only way I can describe it is black and white with a hint of sepia in the mid tones and additional warmth in the highlights.

    Any suggestions?
     
  2. TheFlyingCamera

    TheFlyingCamera Membership Council Council

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    you could sepia-tone a print... print a bit richer than you normally would, say 1/2 to a whole stop darker, then only partially bleach. When you tone, the highlights and midtones will come back in sepia, but your shadows will remain black, as they were never bleached out in the first place.

    You could also try doing a split developer - develop the first 20-30% in a cooltone developer, then switch to a second bath with a warmtone paper developer, like the Ilford Warmtone developer.
     
  3. Jon Shiu

    Jon Shiu Subscriber

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    Hi, here is some info to start: use a cold tone paper like Ilford MG IV and Fotospeed ST20 variable sepia toner. Dilute the bleach to twice the recommended dilution. Mix the toner to mid-brown, I think 100ml additive per liter. Key is to bleach only for a short time, try 1 or 1.5 minutes to start.

    Good luck!

    Jon
     
  4. wiggy

    wiggy Member

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    Cheers for the tips guys. Time to start experimenting.
     
  5. srs5694

    srs5694 Member

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    Another option is to print the B&W negative on color (RA-4) paper and process it using RA-4 chemicals. In principle, this will let you recreate whatever color effects you see from an inkjet printer. In practice, I can't guarantee you'd get whatever subtle midtone/highlight differences you're seeing, but it could be worth trying.
     
  6. TheFlyingCamera

    TheFlyingCamera Membership Council Council

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    The problem with going to RA 4 is twofold-

    1: you'll burn through a LOT of paper trying to get the color balance just right.
    2: the color tone will be uniform across the entire image, and will most likely not be subtle, no matter how carefully you tweak the balance. 1 or 2 cc's of yellow or magenta either way and you could get either too much of what you're looking for, or a nasty cross-over where you can't color correct it at all.