Turning your D3 into a toy film camera

Discussion in 'Lo-Fi Cameras' started by Nicholas Lindan, Nov 9, 2010.

  1. Nicholas Lindan

    Nicholas Lindan Advertiser Advertiser

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  2. bsdunek

    bsdunek Subscriber

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    Think of all the designers, engineers, technicians, etc. that worked long hard hours to achieve the best possible quality image. Now, with a little cardboard, tape, balse, etc., we can degrade that to the level of a kids toy.

    That said, I love my LensBaby on my Nikon F - great fun!
     
  3. Nicholas Lindan

    Nicholas Lindan Advertiser Advertiser

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    And I love my Spiratone Portragon. I have a long-standing plan to mount the lens from an Empire Baby in a Nikon body cap. Part of the Empire Baby's charm is from the curved film plane giving edge to edge sharpness (a relative term) in the horizontal direction and a terrific edge blur in the vertical direction. Rounding the film gate with a file isn't something I really want to do to a Nikon.
     
  4. lns

    lns Member

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    Actually, it's a little strange she (or he) just didn't use software to do this. It probably would take only two clicks.

    I personally would like a camera that exposes my 35mm film all the way to the edge, including the perforations. I guess that's a little toy-like.

    -Laura
     
  5. Roger Thoms

    Roger Thoms Subscriber

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    Here you go.

    http://blackbirdflycamera.com/

    Roger
     
  6. lns

    lns Member

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    I've seen those. Something for the Christmas list, thank you!

    -Laura
     
  7. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    When I saw the thread title I thought the D3 was referring to the Omega enlarger.

    Now that's a big toy camera!
     
  8. Daniel Haskins

    Daniel Haskins Member

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    You got me all excited thinking someone ruined their D3 but cutting it open, gutted it, putting in a pinhole and a primitive film advance.

    What you linked is called "TTV" through the viewfinder. It's not new. Hmmm you could even liken this to the 35mm DOF adapters a lot of people use on their video cameras and even their super 8 cameras sometimes.
     
  9. IloveTLRs

    IloveTLRs Member

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  10. amac212

    amac212 Member

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    I confess that I was one of the early "TTV" adopters back in 2006 AND I was primarily a film shooter. It sprung out of a desire to use a couple non-working squareshooters (A Brownie Starflex and Duoflex) that held sentimental value for me and the love of the non-digital framing and 'schmutz' (left the mirror and glass untouched).

    I had several contraptions - one to attach a digital cam for immediate results and another to attach my film cam. My 'contraptions' have been copied and modified and I admit it's funny to see what others have come up with.

    Always got stares and curious questions ("what kind of camera is THAT!?") and I did find it very enjoyable, but limiting in many ways. In the end, I moved on to medium and large format and have never looked back. To each his own I suppose. :smile: