ultrafine b&w iso100 in 120 who makes it?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by ricksplace, Jun 5, 2009.

  1. ricksplace

    ricksplace Member

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    I did a search here and found that it was Ilford, but isn't now. Some think it is Efke, some think it is Foma, some think it is Chinese. Anyone know for sure? Ultrafine has some good prices on Fuji Superia in 120. I was going to order some so I thought I'd try some of their b&w too.
     
  2. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    Fuji do Acros in 120 and someone here on APUG who seems to be a very experienced person rates it in one particular developer as being the equivalent of a 4x5 neg. Sorry to appear vague but that very person may reply but if he doesn't then a search might reveal the thread where this claim was made.

    I think it was Sandy King but I may be wrong

    pentaxuser
     
  3. sanking

    sanking Member

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    What I have said is that it is possible to get 4X5 quality, or very close to it, with Fuji Acros in a Mamiya 7II. In fact, if you exposed the 4X5 with an ASA 400 film the 6X7 cm Acros negative from Mamiya 7 might actually be better in terms of both grain and detail.

    Sandy





     
  4. tiberiustibz

    tiberiustibz Member

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    It's a nice film. I've made more than a few nice prints off of it.
     
  5. mabman

    mabman Member

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    A caveat here is that as you've seen the actual film that's rebranded as "Ultrafine" has the potential to keep changing, it seems dependent on what they can get and rebrand and/or what's cheapest - so, if you intend to standardize on 1 film, you may need to purchase a large quantity of it now, or take your chances on the actual film stock changing on you.

    A couple of years ago I asked them about this, my concern being I wanted to standardize and didn't want to keep having to adjust development times/procedure for new films repeatedly.

    My emails to them about this were ignored (while a prior question about shipping to Canada was answered, albeit slowly), so it seems they are not eager to share exactly what it is at any given time.

    Contrast this with Freestyle, who give each different film a slightly different name (Arista EDU vs. Arista EDU.Ultra vs. Arista Pro) and are generally forthcoming about each films provenance (except for the newish Pro line, apparently, but relatively easily reverse engineered).

    Caveat emptor, I suppose.
     
  6. jim appleyard

    jim appleyard Member

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    This is a key point, I think. If it were me, I'd just call Freestyle and order some Arista Premium. It's rebranded Plus-X and Tri-X and you know what you're going to get.

    I buy a lot of Ultrafine's El-Cheapo paper and while it's ok for test prints and contact sheets, it has the habit of changing when the supplier runs dry. It went from "no-name" to Kodak to "b/w paper withing the last 18 mos. Who knows what it will be next.