Ultrafine litho film

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by michael_r, Nov 30, 2011.

  1. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

    Messages:
    6,539
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2010
    Location:
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Anyone using this?
     
  2. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

    Messages:
    7,419
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2009
    Location:
    northern Pa.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 30, 2011
  3. Whiteymorange

    Whiteymorange Member

    Messages:
    2,385
    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2004
    Location:
    Boston area
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    It is not Xray film; it is Litho film: slow, high contrast and fun to play with. It may need to be trimmed to fit your holders since I believe it is a full 8x10. Their "Continuous Tone Duplicating Film" is Xray film duplicating film and not, in my opinion, worth the bother. I found the latter product to be so slow as to be unworkable but the litho film equal to EFKE print film in quality if not speed.
     
  4. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

    Messages:
    6,539
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2010
    Location:
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The reason I'm asking is I've been experimenting with several alternatives for making certain types of masks (where an ortho, very high contrast, very slow film is ideal). Two I'm planning on trying in the next few weeks are Rollei ATO 2.1, and Ultrafine Litho. I just received a box of 100 sheets of 4x5" ultrafine but haven't used it yet.

    I'm wondering what to expect in the way of quality (emulsion defects etc), and I'm also wondering about its grain structure - ie since it is super slow, super high contrast, is it also super fine grained like a document film? I'm hoping that is the case.
     
  5. Mike Wilde

    Mike Wilde Member

    Messages:
    2,936
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2006
    Location:
    Misissauaga
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    You may want to mix up or buy a litho developer if you want very high contrast masks, in addition to just using the film with a standard film, or perhaps even paper developer.
     
  6. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

    Messages:
    6,539
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2010
    Location:
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I use dilute developers for masks, but it is not to make the mask high contrast per se. The reason I want a high contrast film is just for the short scale, so I can easily put most of the scale of the original negative on or past the shoulder of the lith film and then develop in a highly dilute developer.
     
  7. Whiteymorange

    Whiteymorange Member

    Messages:
    2,385
    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2004
    Location:
    Boston area
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I have found no defects so far in the box I have of 8x10. I've shot perhaps 15 sheets. since it is basically a graphic arts film, the grain structure is different. Mid-tones, where we see the grain most, tend to drop out. The edges stay very, very sharp.
     
  8. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

    Messages:
    6,539
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2010
    Location:
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Thanks for the responses.