Update On National Park Service Filming Fees

Discussion in 'Ethics and Philosophy' started by Dave Parker, May 4, 2006.

  1. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Inactive

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  2. rbarker

    rbarker Member

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    That's good news . . . maybe.

    The larger issue may be how park officials interpret the equipment being used, and the potential inconsistency in that interpretation - the old "pro" camera on a tripod sort of issue. The "crew of up to 2 peope" would seem to allow one to photograph one's (model-material) spouse with a view camera, but adding a (model-material) daughter might be a problem. :wink:
     
  3. colrehogan

    colrehogan Member

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    I have to agree with Ralph regarding his comment regarding the "pro" camera on a tripod. I mean, bigger camera/more equipment = professional to a lot of people.

    For example, I was shooting with a 4x5 with a 90 mm Nikkor-SW and a tripod a couple of years ago at a balloon glow and I was asked twice (by various people attending the event, not any security related people) if I was with one of the local tv stations.
     
  4. naturephoto1

    naturephoto1 Subscriber

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    Interesting that the article (and I hope the "rule" refers) talks only about film making with only one reference to photographers (which I take as still photographers).

    With more and more of the National Parks restricting access with private vehicular traffic we as nature, landscape and wildlife photographers have enough problem getting ourselves, gear, and camera equipment into these parks.

    Rich
     
  5. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Inactive

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    Well I am going to ask, I am leaving to do a couple of days in Yellowstone in about 15 minutes and will talk to a few of the admin people I know in Yellowstone and see what is up.

    Dave
     
  6. naturephoto1

    naturephoto1 Subscriber

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    But Dave,

    You are in Kalispell, it might be of interest to hear what their take is on this in Glacier as well.

    Rich
     
  7. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Inactive

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    I have a call in to the superindendant and if he don't call back, I am going to have dinner with him next week, so will see what I can find out.

    Dave
     
  8. Lachlan Young

    Lachlan Young Member

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    How could anyone confuse a broadcast video camera with a large format camera? :confused: :D :D

    Lachlan
     
  9. jss

    jss Member

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    the same way people ask, "is that a hasselblad?" when i'm shooting with my LF camera. :smile:

     
  10. naturephoto1

    naturephoto1 Subscriber

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    Well, let's put it this way the public really doesn't know that much when it comes to large format equipment. When my Linhof Technikardan 45S was about new maybe 10 or 11 years ago, people asked me if it were an old camera.

    Rich
     
  11. JBrunner

    JBrunner Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Yeah, people look at my new Tachihara and say, "Wow, thats in incredible shape for such an old camera, do you restore them?"

    Better yet, about 10 years ago I was off the side of a gravel road in North Dakota, with an Arriflex SRII on a big set of Ronfords, shooting amber waves of grain, when an old farmer rattled up in his pickup, and began quizzing me about when the road would be paved. I said "pretty soon" he said "damn strait, you people need to quit surveyen, and get pavin' "

    On topic, the number of people is a pretty good (but not foolproof) way of discerning the level of production on a shoot. I don't think any lone photographer would have trouble with having his or her family along, as that pretty much follows the underlying reason for the parks in the first place. It's a hair that I doubt would be split. I have always found park rangers and park personnel to function on average many points higher, and be much more in tune with reason, than a typical government functionary. They seem to view safety, and preservation of the resource as their main function, and I have no problem with that.