Using and Developing Eastman Plus X 5231

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Pioneer, Sep 24, 2012.

  1. Pioneer

    Pioneer Member

    Messages:
    1,726
    Joined:
    May 29, 2010
    Location:
    Elko, Nevada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I just received a 400 foot roll of Eastman Plus X 5231 and I have a few questions.

    First, the can says that daylight exposure is at ISO 64 but the data sheets for Kodak Plus X shows the film speed to be 125. I intend to do some film speed testing for myself but I wonder which speed I should start with?

    Second, when I develop the film which developer should I be using for best results to start with. The can calls for D-96. Is this similar to D-76? I do have some Kodak HC-110 but I notice that development time for Plus X 125 is very fast using this developer and I suspect I would be better served using a developer that allows a little more time to work. However since Eastman Plus X 5231 seems to be a slightly different animal than Kodak Plus X then the suggested development times may be different.

    I have not done an exhaustive google search but I did review the quickly available Kodak documents and I checked DigitalTruth's Massive Development chart but I really am no closer to having any clear developing times so any help would be appreciated.

    Finally (for now anyway) how do you determine the manufacture date or expiration date for cinema films? I have checked all over the can (and my can of Eastman 5222) and have not spotted anything that I would consider to be an expiration date. Is this something that movie makers don't worry about or am I missing something?

    Thanks for your time.
     
  2. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

    Messages:
    6,241
    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2010
    Location:
    Southern USA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    First this is a cine film and not the same as the still film Plus-X. As such Kodak gives the following speeds 64T and 80D.

    Since you wil not be using it as a cine film you do not have to use D-96 which would produce low contrast negatives for copying on cine positive stock. I have used a lot of this film and would recommend exposing it at an EI of 125 and developing it in HC-110 1+49 for 7 min at 21oC. Use Kodak's recommended agitation scheme.

    Since you mentioned Eastman 5222 expose it at EI 400 and develop in HC-110 for 8.5 min. All other conditions are the same.

    These specifications will produce a CI suitable for a diffusion enlarger.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 24, 2012
  3. Richard S. (rich815)

    Richard S. (rich815) Subscriber

    Messages:
    4,957
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2003
    Location:
    San Francisco
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I've shot a bit. Just treat like Plus-X for start times and such, adjust from there for your taste and desired look.
     
  4. nworth

    nworth Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,191
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    Location:
    Los Alamos,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    PXN 5231 is an older film. My latest data sheet for it in in an old PLI and probably dates from sometime in the 80s. I've used the film, and it is excellent for still work. It has very fine grain, decent resolution, and a nice "look", somewhere between the later PX still film and VP. As for use, when in doubt, start with the information on the can. My data sheet lists the speed as 80 daylight and 64 tungsten. The can would normally list the tungsten speed for motion picture film. D-96 is a derivative of D-76, with a little less sulfite, more borax, and a small amount of bromide. D-76 was the standard motion picture negative developer for years, and you can use it perfectly well. Starting times and dilution should be the same as for D-96, and you can adjust from there. Motion picture negatives film is usually somewhat less contrasty than its still film equivalent, so somewhat extended development (probably no more than 10 percent) may be in order.

    Kodak D-96 motion picture negative developer

    Water (50C) 750 ml
    Metol 2 g
    Sodium sulfite (anh) 75 g
    Hydroquinone 1.5 g
    Potassium bromide 400 mg
    or
    Sodium bromide 350 mg
    Borax (decahydrate) 4.5 g
    WTM 1 l

    pH at 27C =8.6
    Specific gravity at 27C = 1.068
     
  5. nworth

    nworth Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,191
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    Location:
    Los Alamos,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Motion picture stocks were generally used up rapidly, and the users had their own protocols for storage, inventory, and disposal, hence no expiration date. The gererally keep very well, however, especially when refrigerated. As for date codes, they were printed on all Kodak and most other cine stock before 1990. Check here: http://www.film-center.com/dates.html
     
  6. cmacd123

    cmacd123 Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,469
    Joined:
    May 24, 2007
    Location:
    Stittsville, Ontario
    Shooter:
    35mm
    5231 is now a discontinued stock but gives great results. Once you get one roll off you can use the date codes to determine the year of manufacture. It will probably be part of the KeyKode numbers. if it is late production the year may be in the clear! if it is older than Keycode stock the three figures code was used. Keykode stock will not have any marks in ink on teh back of the film, older stock will have a dash between the perfs every 4 perfs in Ink, and footage numbers in Ink also.
     
  7. Pioneer

    Pioneer Member

    Messages:
    1,726
    Joined:
    May 29, 2010
    Location:
    Elko, Nevada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Thanks for all the great info. As soon as I get some images I'll get something posted here. I'll check the keycode list to see if I can decide when this stuff was coated.
     
  8. JPR

    JPR Member

    Messages:
    21
    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2011
    Shooter:
    35mm RF
    Hi Pioneer, did you ever use this stuff? If so, it would be great to see an image and here how you are developing it! Cheers, John
     
  9. Pioneer

    Pioneer Member

    Messages:
    1,726
    Joined:
    May 29, 2010
    Location:
    Elko, Nevada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I haven't. But now that you bring it up I will roll up 3 or 4 rolls and do some shooting to see how it looks.