Using same tank for b/w and color negatives?

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by /dev/null, Nov 3, 2011.

  1. /dev/null

    /dev/null Member

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    Hey,

    I'm new to analog photography, just started developing about a week or 6 ago. Is it a problem when you use the same tank for color and b/w negatives? I developed some color negatives a couple of weeks ago and (of course I washed out the reel and drum very good, Paterson) when I did a b/w 120mm the water was red after I developed. It is getting less and less now, but my b/w negatives show slight signs of darkish red coloring. Are these still the remains of a one time color development? And any ways to clean out the drum and reel thoroughly? I read something about vinegar.

    Thanks.
     
  2. georg16nik

    georg16nik Member

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    1. Soak in distilled water + vinegar or citric acid for about an hour or so.
    2. Flush
    3. Soak in distilled water + backing soda for about an hour or so.
    4. Flush
    5. Wash extensively in distilled water.
    6. Done

    its better to have 2 tanks, one for color and one for B&W, thou You still have to clean them from time to time.
    Plastic ones at some point will get more hassle to clean up.
    Stainless Stell are ok, well, most of them. Usually the reel is very under-engineer thing.. but You cant have it all in one package :smile:
     
  3. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    I've never had any problems switching between the two. I only rinse my stainless tank with hot water and dry it. I couldn't say the same for plastic tanks, never used one for color, only B&W.
     
  4. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Yes you can use the same tank for B&W and Colour just wash well after each use. Some of my Patersontanks are over 40 years old and I've never had a contamination issue.

    The red colour is a dye in the B&W emulsion nothing to do with what the tanks been used for before. Tmax films have the strongest colour, fix a bit longer than usual which is necessary with Tmax films anyway and extend the wash the colour does wash out. Doesn't need to be running water just leave the film soaking.

    Ian
     
  5. /dev/null

    /dev/null Member

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    Ian,

    Maybe it is a dye and nothing to do with that I previously used it for color development. Anyways, this one time the color was dark red with b/w film and now it just comes out a bit reddish color when I do Adox film in Amaloco AM-74.

    So it is quite common that the developer fluid comes out colored after developing? Maybe it is just normal. Sorry, but only just started developing.
     
  6. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    Pretty much what I was going to post. I use the same Nikkor tanks and Jobo Expert Drums for b/w and color. No issues with either if you simply rinse them out after using.

    I don't put Stabilizer or Final Rinse in my Jobo tank, however. I believe I picked up that practice at Jobo's recommendation.
     
  7. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    I do the same with my Hewes SS reels and tanks, and also have no issues. Just regular darkroom cleanliness of washing the equipment really well after use works well.
     
  8. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    All tanks stainless steel or Plastic and particularly reels pick up a trace of gelatin each time you process films, it pays to bleach them in Sodium Hypochlorite (household bleac) ever 6 months or so, I follow that with a good wash in washing powder - biological if there.s some around, then scrub the reels with a toothbrush It's this gelatin that retains traces of wetting agents etc.

    Ian
     
  9. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    There are a number of things used in the manufacture of black and white film that are rinsed out when you develop the film, and some of them impart colour to the chemicals.

    The colour will vary with the film (including the format) and, to a certain extent, the choice of chemistry. It may even vary with pH if you are doing water rinses.

    I pre-rinse all my black and white film before adding the developer (a choice that is somewhat controversial) and the colour of the pre-rinse water varies considerably with the film. My guess is that the initial colour comes from the anti-halation dies added to the sub-strate.

    My favourite pre-rinse colour is the beautiful cyan tinged dark blue I get when I develop 120 Plus-X :sad:.

    While some of the colour creating agents are removed with just a water pre-rinse, others will not become evident until you are further along with the process.
     
  10. /dev/null

    /dev/null Member

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    The 'mystery' is solved, this comes when I develop Adox CHS Art, then the developer turns red when I rinse it out :smile: Thanks for all the replies.