Velvia 100F = E100VS

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by pukalo, Dec 7, 2012.

  1. pukalo

    pukalo Member

    Messages:
    121
    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2006
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I shot E100VS and Velvia 100F side by side at a car show this summer, and recently as the two 120 strips hung side by side drying, I realized they were near clones. Almost exact same colors, only difference was that the Velvia 100F handled the mixed light shots inside the bowling alley much better - no ugly green cast to the fluorescent light.
    Anyways, that is when I realized that Velvia 100F was probably designed as a competitor to E100VS: similar colors, decent skin tones (with flash), bery similar to e100VS, but better at handling mixed light, and more archival. Higher tech, as it came out a few years after E100VS.
    On a similar note, I think E100G was Kodaks answer to Astia 100f. But far less similarity here in color response than E100VS/Velvia 100F.
     
  2. JLP

    JLP Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,609
    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2006
    Location:
    Oregon
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    That is an interesting observation, i have no extended experience with any of the film but have used both and like the Kodak E100VS but never liked the Fuji 100F. Maybe the mixed lighting make them look identical but shot in daylight i found the two film to be very different.
     
  3. EASmithV

    EASmithV Member

    Messages:
    1,926
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2008
    Location:
    Maryland
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Then why the hell do they call it Velvia?! To me, Velvia is a landscape film with horrible skin tones that should never be used for people. Why would they undermine a product that they intend to replace a product that has historically good skin tones?
     
  4. Roger Cole

    Roger Cole Member

    Messages:
    5,454
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2011
    Location:
    Atlanta GA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I always seemed to be able to get better results, or at least good results easier, with E100VS than with any variety of Velvia, though I never tried the 100F. I think it just seemed to have less of that excess contrast.

    Doesn't really matter though as it's all gone. :sad: I also learned to really like E100G after Astia was killed off - again, all gone. :sad:
     
  5. thuggins

    thuggins Member

    Messages:
    456
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2008
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Never saw anyone say the colors of Velvia and VS are "clones". It has been years since I shot Velvia, but every Fuji film I ever used has a cold cast (Velvia, Provia or print film). Kodak films always had a warm cast (and damn them to hell for taking it away from us).
     
  6. DREW WILEY

    DREW WILEY Member

    Messages:
    4,954
    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2011
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    Every one of these films was somewhat different. But I don't think of Fuji films as "cold" whatsoever.
    In terms of neutrality, Astia 100F was king, with E100G being second.
     
  7. Roger Cole

    Roger Cole Member

    Messages:
    5,454
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2011
    Location:
    Atlanta GA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    +1, my experience too. I loved Astia, went to E100G when Fuji dropped it and learned to like it almost as much. I still have some in my freezer along with its near-clone in amateur form, Elitechrome 100. Once that's gone - I guess it's Provia and maybe a little Velvia when the light is flat and the colors could use the punch, until the lights are turned up and the chairs put on the tables for E6.
     
  8. Hatchetman

    Hatchetman Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,221
    Joined:
    May 27, 2011
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I do agree that they are similar. They scan much differently though, I have no idea why.