Viewing Slides - how?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Equipment' started by Emil, May 12, 2009.

  1. Emil

    Emil Member

    Messages:
    86
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2009
    Location:
    Århus, Denma
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Hello!

    I have recently started shooting slide film, and I think it's a really great way to evaluate my shots.

    I have a small viewer for mounted slides (I don't have mine mounted) and it works really well, but it doesn't magnify enough for critical viewing. It's the kind with an opaque dome on one end, and the eyepiece on the other end, and the slide in between. But I need a way to see them bigger, and in more detail.

    What do you suggest I look for? I would love to have some device that let me see it bigger, but still backlit.

    I have of course considered a projektor, but I don't have space for one. Plus it's the whole backlight aspect that makes it interesting for me

    Thank you,

    Emil
     
  2. rthomas

    rthomas Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,192
    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2009
    Location:
    Charlotte, NC, USA
    Shooter:
    35mm
    If space is an issue, a decent quality 8x loupe (magnifying eyepiece without a viewer attached) and a desktop light box (8x10 inches or so) ought to do the trick. For the light box, look for one with 5000K lamps.
     
  3. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

    Messages:
    9,066
    Joined:
    May 3, 2006
    Location:
    Ryde, Isle o
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    When you say you don't have room for a projector, I assume you mean for the projector and screen and the space between them.

    It is possible to buy a projector with its own integral screen which looks a bit like a portable TV and is about the same size.



    Steve.
     
  4. Emil

    Emil Member

    Messages:
    86
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2009
    Location:
    Århus, Denma
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Steve, I know the type of slide viewer you mention, but I haven't seen one that would accept unmounted slide film. Otherwise that would be awesome.

    Where would one shop for a desktop light box?
     
  5. Ektagraphic

    Ektagraphic Member

    Messages:
    2,914
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2009
    Location:
    Southeastern
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I really reccomend picking up a projector. It is the best way to view slides. You don't need too much room for one. They are pretty small and can just project onto the wall if you need them to.
     
  6. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

    Messages:
    9,066
    Joined:
    May 3, 2006
    Location:
    Ryde, Isle o
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I'm not sure what you can do if you want to keep your slides un-mounted and, I assume, un-cut.

    When I was at school (30 years ago) we had a projector which took 35mm film from reel to reel horizontally (stills, not movie). It looked a bit like a modern version of a lantern slide projector. Not much use if you don't have room for it though.



    Steve.
     
  7. Emil

    Emil Member

    Messages:
    86
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2009
    Location:
    Århus, Denma
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Thanks for the input, all.
    For me it would be a lot of trouble cutting and mounting the slides, I am just looking for a way to evaluate before I have prints made or scanning.

    Anyone here use a microscope for evaluating? How much (or little) magnification is needed to see the fine detail?
     
  8. Paul Jenkin

    Paul Jenkin Member

    Messages:
    483
    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2008
    Location:
    Essex, UK.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
  9. Emil

    Emil Member

    Messages:
    86
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2009
    Location:
    Århus, Denma
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Wow, that looks great (although a little expensive). 21x21cm screen! Do you know if it will take unmounted film?
     
  10. Nicholas Lindan

    Nicholas Lindan Advertiser Advertiser

    Messages:
    2,386
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2006
    Location:
    Cleveland, O
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Get a decent projector, used ones go for less than the cost of a good loupe. Kodak Carousels are the standard and have a stack loader accessory. 60mm WA retrofocus lenses are available for getting a large screen image in a small space. Some Kodaks have a built-in flip-out monitor screen.
     
  11. Darkroom317

    Darkroom317 Member

    Messages:
    613
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2009
    Location:
    Rogers, AR
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Is there any way, other than a light table, to view 120 transparencies?
     
  12. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

    Messages:
    9,066
    Joined:
    May 3, 2006
    Location:
    Ryde, Isle o
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    An overhead projector perhaps?


    Steve.
     
  13. Ian Cooper

    Ian Cooper Member

    Messages:
    67
    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2009
    Location:
    Salop, UK
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Of course - a 120 format slide projector!

    They were made by a number of different companies, personally I have a Hasselblad PCP80, although before that I had a Procabin 6x7 for a short time - the 'blad lens is better quality and the use of a magazine feed is a lot easier to handle.
     
  14. Lightproof

    Lightproof Member

    Messages:
    81
    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Try to get a second hand stereo microscope like this: http://seoenterprises.com/shop/image.php?productid=16208
    and a flat light table. Place the table under the microscope and put your slide on it. I recommend the use of a light table over the use of a microscope that is already prepared for transmitted-light microscopy because of the known light temperature of common light tables.
     
  15. Silverhead

    Silverhead Member

    Messages:
    277
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2006
    Location:
    Southern Cal
    Shooter:
    Plastic Cameras
    Emil, I have several Kodak carousel projectors and I can tell you from experience that they really don't take up a lot of room. You can project a decent-sized image onto a wall from only a few feet, which should be large enough for most of the evaluating you'd be doing. If you got a stack-mount slide projector, that might take up even less room...Vivitar made a decent one, IIRC. Obviously you'd need to research the dimensions of each, but that shouldn't be too hard.
     
  16. DannL

    DannL Member

    Messages:
    587
    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2006
    Location:
    Oklahoma
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Scan your slides and view them on a monitor or via projection. The APUG gallery for example is comprised of scanned images, photographs and slides of varying dimensions. You would want to scan at resolutions that work best for your viewing equipment.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 12, 2009
  17. Ektagraphic

    Ektagraphic Member

    Messages:
    2,914
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2009
    Location:
    Southeastern
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Some of the Dukane filmstrip projects sound like they will do you well. They will project rolls of unmounted film.
     
  18. Francis in VT

    Francis in VT Member

    Messages:
    124
    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2006
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Nicholas Lindan;797468]Get a decent projector, used ones go for less than the cost of a good loupe. Kodak Carousels are the standard and have a stack loader accessory. 60mm WA retrofocus lenses are available for getting a large screen image in a small space.

    In addition, Kodak sold an Audio/Visual adapter which replaced the Carousel Lens. This A/V adapter had cranks and sprockets to show strips of slide film.
     
  19. Nicholas Lindan

    Nicholas Lindan Advertiser Advertiser

    Messages:
    2,386
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2006
    Location:
    Cleveland, O
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The A/V strip projectors are designed to show 1/2 frame - well actually full movie frame, 1/2 35mm still camera frame. The film moves vertically through the projector. The problem with projecting a roll of slides is that you need to take all pictures in one orientation or have a rotating strip film holder.

    Time has shown that putting slides in individual mounts is the best way to handle them.

    I even mount my most used 35mm B&W negatives in slide mounts - it cuts down on handling strips of film in the enlarger and eliminates the problem of scratches.

    Film strips are (were) used in A/V settings because of ease of handling, compact storage, and low cost. Scratched and dusty film was considered the norm.