Walz Filter Concern For Argus C3

Discussion in 'Rangefinder Forum' started by Clocker, May 17, 2012.

  1. Clocker

    Clocker Member

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    I have been collecting little accessories for use in an Argus C3 and just recently purchased a Walz 85c warming filter which I have considered using for special daylight effect use in the morning or late afternoon.

    I have a concern about it though.

    When looking through it with the naked eye it looks fine, but when examining it at a particular reflective angle with a rather powerful eyeloop (10x and 20x on opposite ends) it shows some crackling of the filter material.

    Could this be a lens fungus?

    If so, how might I treat it or should I just not use it?

    Or is it just the age and manner of manufacture of the filter?

    All my other Walz filters are in fairly good shape and do not show any significant amount of deterioration.

    I really do not want to spend the extra money on Leica Elmar filters if I could find the ones I want, which are probably a better quality in manufacture.

    I am reluctant to use this particular filter, because of the risk of a lens fungus infection that could spread to my best Argus C3 which has been fully refurbished to factory conditions.

    Any corrective advice or information on this concern would be appreciated.

    Thank you for taking the time to read this.
     
  2. Gatsby1923

    Gatsby1923 Member

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    I have never heard of that happening and Lens Fungus needs a dark cool place to get a foothold. Try it on another C3 and see if you like the optical quality.
     
  3. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

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    Your Walz filter is probably a gel sandwiched between two pieces of glass. It's deteriorating; get a good filter say a Kodak or other. Quite a lot of accesories were made for these cameras, a little digging should turn something up.
     
  4. Clocker

    Clocker Member

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    I have decided not to use it, the crackling in it turned out to be microscopic hairline cracks on both sides of the glass. I believe you may be correct about it being a gel sandwiched between two glass pieces.

    I will see if I can find a 30mm Series V Drop-In filter of the same type and use an adapter.

    Now I just have to find some of these filters in very good to excellent condition.
     
  5. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

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    I have seen separation on Kodak filters of that era too. Seem to me that if you need a 10x loupe to see hte defect then it is rather miniscule and most likely a meaningless defect. What I have seen are much larger defects -- like covering between 20 and 50% of the filter surface. Finding vintage filters in good to excellent condition isn't impossible... it just takes time and perserverence.