warm tone developer for Ilford MG Art300

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by I.Hiroki, May 20, 2012.

  1. I.Hiroki

    I.Hiroki Member

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    Hello, everyone. This is my first time to write on APUG.:smile:
    And I have questions about MG Art300 b/w paper.


    I've just got couple of boxes of Ilford MG Art300 few month ago.
    There is a plan to use them a month later.
    Many photographers seem to be favourably impressed by the texture of it.
    But I'm wondering at the tone of it,
    some men say "beautiful warm tone" , another men say
    "it is quite neutral although I used warm tone developer".
    It must be differences among individuals.
    Though I absolutely like worm tone.
    Do you have any information of develpers to make it warm tone?
    Or do you think that Dektol developer(Almost same as D-72)
    which was added few potassium bromide make it warm enough?
    I am keen to know them. Thank you.
     
  2. Bob Carnie

    Bob Carnie Subscriber

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    I use dektol with this paper with a slight sepia tone and really like it ... this is so subjective you need to try it yourself and see with you own eyeballs.
     
  3. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    The tone varies even with a warm tone developer depending on the exposure & development time, the shorter the dev time the warmer the image, and vice versa.

    So someone might dev for 3 minutes in the same developer that I use for 45 seconds and the image colour/tone would be much cooler at 3 mins. Temperature has an effect as well.

    I use Id-78 which is just an earlier Ilford warm tone developer (once sold in powder form) than their current Warmtone developer. Dektol with an extra 2 gms per/litre Bromide won't be far behind.

    Ian
     
  4. I.Hiroki

    I.Hiroki Member

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    Hi,bob:smile:
    thank you for your respons.
    You use Dektol and it makes it sepia,
    did you add any chemical or much water?
    im keen to print but it's not possible right now:sad:
     
  5. I.Hiroki

    I.Hiroki Member

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    Hi Ian.
    thank you for your answer and precious information!
    uhmmm. I decided to use Dektol with bromide at first.
    it is quite easy to make it :smile:
    of course I am keen to try Id-78
    I will tell you my impression after I try them.
    Thank you
     
  6. R.Gould

    R.Gould Member

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    I use the fotospeed wt10 warm tone developer at the 1/19 dilution for all warm tone papers. both rc and fb, should work well with the mg art papers, although I have not used it yet. develop for between 3 and 4 minutes.
    Richard
     
  7. Bob Carnie

    Bob Carnie Subscriber

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    No the developer Dektol give me a nice neutral looking print with this paper
    I then use a bleach and tone method to warm up the print. followed by a strong selenium quick inversion about 10 seconds
    This turns the image a bit coppery which I find very nice.

    So you develop as normal,,, fix wash ..

    then you tone to change the warmth of the print.
     
  8. Mahler_one

    Mahler_one Member

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    I have used Ilford MG developer with great results. When I desire a slightly warmer tone I use Moersch Sepia Developer. I like the color of the paper as is, and hence I tone for permanence without a conscious effort to change the color of either the image or the paper. As Bob and Ian have inferred, use the paper with developer and toners so as to achieve the results that you desire. No way to know what various combinations will "achieve" until you do "your own thing" with your own negatives. Goggle the article on Multigrade Art 300 that was written recently by Dr. Tim Rudman. Lots of information about toning, color, etc., etc.
     
  9. I.Hiroki

    I.Hiroki Member

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    Hi Richard.
    It sounds nice:smile:
    maybe it's not easy to get it im my county, I reckon.
    i may buy it through B&H.
    thank you for your help.

     
  10. I.Hiroki

    I.Hiroki Member

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    Hi Bob.
    i get it. you do bleach and tone. it must be beautiful.
    but also it sounds complicated and difficult.
    I'll try it one day after I make beautiful normal print.
    thank you:smile:

     
  11. I.Hiroki

    I.Hiroki Member

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    Hi Mahler.
    uhmmm
    I'm supposed to do toning to make it warm tone well.
    but selenium toning improve the strings.
    if I use the paper and this toning technique, it must be beautiful.
    and I found the article written by Dr. Tim Rudman.
    it is so helpful:smile:thank you for your help.

     
  12. Bob Carnie

    Bob Carnie Subscriber

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    Not difficult , but if you use the formula I do pretty stinky so you need a well ventilated area.
    For me toning is the last stage of a beautiful process where not only the visual tone is changed to a look you
    like but as well the toning stage seems to impart a slight pop to the image which makes the print kind of jump out
    at you when viewing.
    For all my work { personal and client} that is slated for walls , I prefer to tone. Sometimes its just selenium toner , other times its
    sepia and selenium or other toners combined.

    This process is very hard to describe and as some point out Tim Rudman has great books on the subject, but I should point out
    Eddie Ephrams has two wonderful books, Creative Elements and Gradient Light that I think are superb on the topic of printing and toning.

    If you are located in an area where photochemicals are hard to get then I would suggest mixing from scratch and there are some real experts here on APUG that have helped me over the years with formulas.

    have fun.

     
  13. I.Hiroki

    I.Hiroki Member

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    Hi bob.thank you for your opinion about toning:smile:
    i definitely try bleach and selenium toning to make works.
    It is not my favourite to compromise, besides many great photographers don't compromise like my favourite japanese photographer Herbie Yamaguchi. To study about techniques on APUG must makes me close to professional. I feel ive got great teachers on it
    I hope to keep in touch with you.
    Thank you.
     
  14. Ghostman

    Ghostman Subscriber

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    I made a few prints on Art 300 this weekend. I used Ilford/Harman warm tone developer and then did a bleach/sepia/selenium toning process. The bleach was 1:50 for 1 minute, the sepia was 1:50 for 10 seconds and selenium was 1:20 for about a minute. It's come out golden/brass in colour and has made someone very happy.