"Warming polariser"

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by rossb, May 22, 2006.

  1. rossb

    rossb Member

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    Much is written regarding the advantages of the (horrifically expensive) "warming polariser" filters. Is there a profound optical advantage to their use, versus a polariser and KR1.5 in tandem
    Regards to all
    Ross
     
  2. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Inactive

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    You might do a search using the key word "Moose" as there was a very large and lengthy conversation about this very thing not to long ago.

    R.
     
  3. mark

    mark Member

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    And Moose filters are not horrifically expensive.


    Yes they are a good thing. Stacking filters will cause vignetting (sp) on my wide lenses, the moose does not. I have not use my non warming polarizor since I got my Moose warming filter.
     
  4. rossb

    rossb Member

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    Thanks for that

    Ross
     
  5. naturephoto1

    naturephoto1 Subscriber

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    As Roxi331 indicated, check the discussion and search for "moose". Specifically to your question, yes you can use the filters in tandem and I have done so in the past. You can check my image in my gallery here at APUG:

    http://www.apug.org/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=14313&cat=500&ppuser=11550

    However, when using 2 filters you will now be using 4 "glass" to air surfaces versus 2. Subsequent to taking the above photo which in reality is remarkably sharp, I have used warm polarizing filters almost exclusively for my color transparencies. Using the single filter is also much more convenient. In addition, I have on order (backordered and waiting for the glass) the new Singh-Ray lighter brighter warm polarizer to fit the Cokin P filter holder (fits the round slot and can be used with a variety of lens threads up to 82mm with the appropriate adapter ring). Yes it is extremely expensive. However this filter will only lose about 1 - 1 1/2 stop of light as opposed to the more normal 2- 2 1/2 stop light loss of a regular polarizing filter by itself. This increase in speed for light transmission of about a stop or so is particularly useful for work with slower large format lenses.

    Rich
     
  6. roteague

    roteague Member

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    Agreed with everyone above.

    Keep in mind, your results will also depends upon which "Warming Polarizing" filter you choose. Most are Polarizing/81A combinations, the Tiffen is a Polarizing/812 combination, which I believe also incorporates a CC10R. The Tiffen version is my preference.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 22, 2006
  7. naturephoto1

    naturephoto1 Subscriber

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    I agree with Robert. This had been my warm polarizing filter of choice for some time. See example using this polarizing filter at APUG in my gallery:

    http://www.apug.org/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=14301&cat=500&ppuser=11550

    I later replaced it with the original Singh-Ray A-13 Warm Polarizing filter. However, as I mentioned above, for most applications I will be using the new Singh Ray lighter brighter warm polarizer for the Cokin P holder. If I will find the need for more color I would then use the Tiffen warm polarizing filter with the 812 filter. It does add a nice amount of warmth for the appropriate subject and conditions.

    Rich
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 22, 2006