Wash prints in tubes?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Dave Starr, May 3, 2005.

  1. Dave Starr

    Dave Starr Member

    Messages:
    110
    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2004
    Location:
    Flint, MI
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    Black & white prints can be developed in tubes (print drums, etc.). Can they be washed in tubes? Would there be a problem with the back of the print not getting washed? I'm referring to standing the tube, or drum, on end, dropping a small hose into the drum & washing the print that way.
     
  2. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

    Messages:
    4,677
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2004
    Location:
    Italia
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    With colour I do a couple of runs with water. With the drum rotating. Then I pull the print out and finish it in a tray with running water. I've considered hooking up one of those Jobo wash hoses I was given. It needs a film lid instead of a print lid. What worries me is the rush of water will damage the edges of the print. Some times I'll just stand the print tank under the tap and I try and remember to make sure the tank is full of water. If the force of the tap water hits the edges of the print instead of the middle of the tank I'm fairly sure it's caused damage in the past to my prints. Of course I could just be avoiding blame for something I did.
     
  3. Dave Starr

    Dave Starr Member

    Messages:
    110
    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2004
    Location:
    Flint, MI
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    What I'm really thinking of is a tube-style print washer for B&W. Cut plastic pipe into lengths, cap one end & drill a hole at the bottom & put a fitting in it for an inlet & let it overflow. Something along the lines of the "Wat-Air" film washer, but for prints.
     
  4. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

    Messages:
    4,677
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2004
    Location:
    Italia
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Could you use two lengths of pipe nested inside each other? The inside one would have holes drilled in it. The water would flow into the inside pipe. Flow around the print then overflow into the second pipe. With it draining. The outer piper could be anything big enough to hold the first pipe. You'd wash front and back of the print.
     
  5. chuck94022

    chuck94022 Subscriber

    Messages:
    684
    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2005
    Location:
    Los Altos, C
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Wouldn't you just be encourging curling? Seems like flat would be better for prints.