water temp regulators

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by CPorter, Dec 17, 2011.

  1. CPorter

    CPorter Member

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    Been looking in the archives and I've seen on more than one occasion that a regulator that provides a "low flow" rate may be one that is more suitable to the home darkroom. I've found an Arkay model (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/2793-REG/Arkay_602579_Econo_Reg_1B_D_Water.html) that provides a 1/2 to 2 1/2 gpm rate, it seems to be the only one I've seen that offers the lower flow rate---just wandering what the thoughts are on this as compared to the many other models that go up to 7 gpm. I know there are many thoughts also out there that it is not needed, save those thoughts please, I'm getting one.

    thanks
    Chuck
     
  2. zsas

    zsas Member

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    Have you considered a DIY solution? I am no plumber but could possibly build one after seeing the one I have.

    The below is my sink, I have not hooked it up. The prior owner made it (although he was an engineer); it looks somewhat doable with manual regulator handles??? One for hot, one for cold, then a temp gague....

    [​IMG]
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    [​IMG]
     
  3. Bill Burk

    Bill Burk Subscriber

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    Haas Intellifaucet has low flow rate. And instant "right-on" temperature.

    I "wish" I'd gotten one. Got a Leonard instead and still use Kodak tank and tray siphon so I have to run water faster than I would really like.

    Don't know how quick the return on investment will be, but I would expect with lower water bills it would pay for itself soon enough.
     
  4. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

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    On my Powers Fotopanel, I can get just a trickle of water by turning the on-off valve nearly off. However, the temp regulator needs to be re-adjusted at that low flow and it is out side the operating specs of the device. Its fine to trickle it like that for washing, but it does need a faster flow rate (as many of the mechanical thermostatic regulators) to provide a reliable constant temp. for temp-sensitive processes.
     
  5. langedp

    langedp Member

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    Not quite. I have one and really like it but it's not instant right on temperature. It takes it a few seconds to over a minute depending on the temperature changes of the incoming water. If the hot coming in isn't stable yet or the cold coming in isn't stable yet, it hunts around as the incoming water temp ramps up or down. You have to clear the "old" water in the house pipes first so that the incoming water in the hot and cold lines is relatively stable. Same would be true for the mechanical regulators.
     
  6. CPorter

    CPorter Member

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    It seems the maximum flow rate at 68 deg F that my faucet can provide is about 2 1/2 gpm, that's with the cold water wide open and the hot adjusted to bring in the preferred temperature. I live in a rural area where the water pressure is not as high as I know it is at my mom's house in town, maybe for me a low flow rate model is the way to go.
     
  7. canuhead

    canuhead Member

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    Ic-racer's experiences with the Powers panel mirror mine. I use very minimal flows (< 1 litre/minute ) when washing prints in my Summitek and find if the flow is too low, temp drops a bit. Imo, there's really no need for anything more than 4 litres/minute.
     
  8. RalphLambrecht

    RalphLambrecht Subscriber

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    this is my prime choice
     

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  9. CPorter

    CPorter Member

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    Thanks Ralph,

    Does this unit just plug into the nearest wall outlet?
     
  10. CRhymer

    CRhymer Subscriber

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    Hello Chuck,

    I have a Powers Fotopanel (which works OK), a Honeywell - Sparco thermostatic mixing valve, and most recently a Haas Intellifacet that Ralph recommends. It is superb. I wish I had bought it first. I use the Intellifacet for precision control and the Sparco for less demanding control when I need two water temperatures at the same time. The Haas has a small transformer/power supply that plugs into a regular wall outlet. A GFI is recommended, but that is a good idea in a wet darkroom anyway. The Haas is worth every penny, IMHO. It has fixed temperature detents on the dial, but they can be adjusted if other temperatures are required, as can the linearity of the dial.

    Cheers,
    Clarence
     
  11. RalphLambrecht

    RalphLambrecht Subscriber

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    correct!
     
  12. MaximusM3

    MaximusM3 Member

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    Got myself a Haas Intellifaucet a month ago and it was some of the best money I've spent for my darkroom. Just some plumbing and filtering involved and works like a charm. Temperatures are spot on and it's a major time and water saver.
     
  13. Trond

    Trond Subscriber

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    I agree. The Intellifaucet is a real timesaver, and the temperature is spot on. A bit pricy, but worth every penny.

    Trond