What are these marks on my film?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by StoneNYC, Mar 8, 2014.

  1. StoneNYC

    StoneNYC Subscriber

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    This seems to have started when I began using the JOBO processor and 2509n reel, I can't figure out what it is... It's only on the side WITHOUT emulsion. Everything else in my process hasn't changed since switching from the MOD54 to the JOBO 2509n...

    It's been showing up with both Rodinal and DD-X that I've used... Again everything else I've done is the same...

    ImageUploadedByTapatalk1394317390.128118.jpg

    Thanks
     
  2. joh

    joh Subscriber

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    do you use/have the plastic inserts for the 2509n reel?
    without them there could be banding from the flow of the chemistry, I've never seen it,
    but often heard of it. Most people prefer the 3000 series drums for sheetfilm cause of this.
     
  3. StoneNYC

    StoneNYC Subscriber

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    Yes I use those inserts...

    I'm thinking it could be too much photoflo/wetting agent but I've never had this issue before and I haven't changed my amount I use...
     
  4. timor

    timor Member

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    This tiny lines ? On dry film ? It doesn't look like a too much wetting agent. Can you scratch it off with finger ?
     
  5. StoneNYC

    StoneNYC Subscriber

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    I will try when I'm home on Wednesday
     
  6. timor

    timor Member

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    I am just curious if it is a deposit or what else. Never seen such a thing before. Very strange.
     
  7. Andrew Johns

    Andrew Johns Member

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    I've had the same thing show up on my film. I think they are streaks caused by excessive wetting agent.

    They don't show up in the print.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 10, 2014
  8. StoneNYC

    StoneNYC Subscriber

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    Yes, doesn't seem to affect the scan, and is NOT on the emulsion side.

    I'll use less wetting agent and see if that helps.
     
  9. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    if you use photoflo, you only need a few drops/ tray, tank &c
    more than a few drops &c is bad news ...

    a small bottle seems to be a lifetime supply
     
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  10. Andrew Johns

    Andrew Johns Member

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    I developed a roll of 120 film last week and skipped the wetting agent all together. The streaks are gone!

    I'll need to get a dropper to control the amount of agent I use. I've just been guesstimating it.
     
  11. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

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    Don't use photoflo/wetting agent, but after washing swirl the film for 30 seconds in de-ionised water.
     
  12. StoneNYC

    StoneNYC Subscriber

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    Using less fixed the issue.

    I don't know where deionized water could be had
     
  13. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

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    Your local supermarket.
     
  14. edcculus

    edcculus Member

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    Get distilled if you don't see DI water.
     
  15. StoneNYC

    StoneNYC Subscriber

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    Thanks guys, less worked fine and I'm not buying bottled water, the fact they sell it at all makes me grumpy...
     
  16. Truzi

    Truzi Subscriber

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    Stone, you do understand distilled and deionized water are not the same as bottled "spring" water, right? They have legitimate uses where "drinking" water would not be desirable.
     
  17. StoneNYC

    StoneNYC Subscriber

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    Yea, I understand, the whole isle just makes me mad though... All that waste, convincing people to pay money for water in a country like ours... It's ridiculous, half the time the bottled water is worse quality than the tap water! Grrr and all the wasted plastic feeding the garbage patch (water bottle islands)

    http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Pacific_garbage_patch

    http://tx.english-ch.com/teacher/yvette/level-a/the-secret-of-pacific-ocean/

    http://www.democraticunderground.com/10021212067

    It makes me crazy...

    Ok I'm done
     
  18. Truzi

    Truzi Subscriber

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    I had an international-student friend from Japan who liked to go to a local "organic" grocer and get "spring water" from a machine (you had to bring your own jug). I went with her one day and pointed to the copper line going into the back of the machine - I told her she could just by a decent filter for her faucet at home and it would come out cheaper. It was so difficult to convince her it wasn't really spring water. On the other hand, she was living in Cleveland, and the municipal water supply isn't the greatest.

    My father had COPD, and we had an oxygen machine in the house. For that we used distilled water to keep the air supply at the right humidity. This is one of many areas distilled is better.
     
  19. TheToadMen

    TheToadMen Subscriber

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    Using tap water is usually no problem (at least in Holland). The only thing with tap water is, that it contains a lot of air. The air is "mixed in" while taping the water from the faucet. Especially when a filter is used. No problem while drinking water, but it might be a problem for mixing chemicals.

    So - if this is a problem - just tap some bottles of water in advance and let it rest for a week or so in a cool place, thus letting the absorbed air come out again naturally.

    With some alt-photo processes this is sometimes a problem. Like with carbon printing. When the transfer paper is coated with a layer of carbon tissue, it needs to settle and dry overnight. If there is a lot of air in the used water/tissue, you might get tiny pinholes from air bubbles popping. Not a good thing.
     
  20. StoneNYC

    StoneNYC Subscriber

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    I specifically use the kitchen sink because it has a dedicated filter that's separate from the faucet area, so no water bubbles added :smile:
     
  21. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    stone, most suppliers of photochemistry suggest you use distilled water to mix chemistry
    because some tap waters are full of chemical additives the municipal water supplies uses to clean the water
    chlorine for one, doesn't play well with some photo chemistries
    and iron from the pipes doesn't either. its not the air, but sometimes the PH.
    ( just leave your water in a jug overnight to fix the ph ) ..

    people are lucky if their water is "good" it wasn't long ago that public water supplies
    were contaminated with all sorts of things that would make you sick if you drank it ...
    ( and well waters too ) ... im not talking about mineralization and "hardness" but other stuff ...
     
  22. markaudacity

    markaudacity Member

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    ...also it's only a dollar a gallon. Cheapest photo chemical in the world. ^_^
     
  23. edcculus

    edcculus Member

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    Yes, distilled and DI water have legitmate uses and are not designed for drinking. Fuji recommends we use distilled water in the plate processor at the print shop I work at to control the pH of the developer. Its between buying large jugs of distilled water, or buying a $3000 inline deionizer, and resin chambers that run about $100 a pop when they need to be changed.

    I also am a homebrewer. Ive taken to buying distilled water to brew with for a few reasons. 1 - no chlorine. 2 - I can control the mineral content since I'm starting from a "zero" state. In addition to my mash bill and hop schedule, I also have a water recipe depending on what kind of beer I'm brewing.

    You can distill your own water...but its so much cheaper just to buy it