What are your future plans for the use of E-6 and C-41 materials?

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by scheimfluger_77, Sep 25, 2012.

  1. scheimfluger_77

    scheimfluger_77 Subscriber

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    Caution: Semi long post.

    I recently acquired a Jobo CPP2 system (along with some other goodies) for a reasonable price and am weighing the possibility of resale vs. getting into the mail order film processing business. To that end I’m curious about your view of your personal usage of E6 & C41 materials for the next 5 years.

    I am not new to color processing and process control as I have 8 year’s experience in C41 from late ‘80’s to early ‘90’s. Although those systems were continuous, replenished systems. The last half of that was in my own mini lab, so I’m pretty familiar with that end of the film business.

    My challenge will be getting up to speed on E6 and deciding how to approach chemistry management in both cases; 1-shot or replenished. I’ve been reading as many old threads as possible on APUG to get a feel for the particulars. It seems the balance between convenience and cost savings is more or less leveled out by the time involved. While I understand the difference between seasoned/replenished systems versus 1-shot w/starter in the mixes, I’m having trouble getting my head around the terminology manufacturers use to denote their various products and which is meant for a high-volume system and which for low volume production lines like I’m anticipating for myself.

    I’ll be able to handle anything up to 4x5 in the Jobo and will be looking to expand that. One wrinkle I see is slide mounting. At present I don’t have any set-up for that and don’t plan to add that capability—though I’m open to rethinking that if needed. I do have an Epson 3200 scanner and will probably include a ‘contact sheet’ scan. I will not be doing color printing on silver-based materials, and I haven’t given much thought to offering color printing from digital.

    My question to all of you is; do you feel inclined to respond if I create a short, 10-question poll on Survey Monkey asking about your film and service usage as it relates to you for the next 5-7 years? I thought that would be easier to deal with than creating a monster thread here. I also encourage further discussion here as well. Thanks.

    Steve Giesel
     
  2. Tom Kershaw

    Tom Kershaw Subscriber

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    I'm more concerned about E6 than C-41 in terms of future viability; my rather ill-timed foray into Ilfochrome printing means I now need to make good use of expensive materials, necessitating much E6 based photography, so I'll need to get my Jobo ATL-2300 up and running again; hoping my Kodak E6 kit is still viable.

    Tom
     
  3. Wolfeye

    Wolfeye Subscriber

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    I think the biggest challenge will be digitizing the processed film. I have the film, I have the chemicals, and I have enough cameras to last until I die, but if my Nikon Coolscan 5000 ever dies I will be one sad monkey.
     
  4. Shootar401

    Shootar401 Member

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    Well I just sold both of DLSRs a Nikon D300 and D3s. I upgraded to an F5 and a 2nd RZ67.

    Nuff Said

    But seriously, I have about 500 sheets of 4x5 between Kodak, Fuji and Ilford. And about 200 rolls of 120 in my freezer. I buy 35mm when I need it. I'm more concerned about chemistry than film at this point since I only shoot about 2 rolls a month, and 4x5 here and there. I have enough film to last the rest of my life at the rate I shoot.
     
  5. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    my biggest plans are to shoot all the e6 + c41 film i have
    and i have a boatload of 35mm, 120, 4x5 and 5x7
    and i will process it in sumatranol 130 film developer.
    yes, i know it is a black/white film developer, but there is no one
    local who will process color bigger than 35mm and i really don't want
    to deal with shipping &c ... or using color chemistry here at home ...
    SO
    it will all be converted to b/w film with a color cast that i can remove using
    current technology. the grain is nice + smooth and i really can't complain :wink:

    i have a few photographs in my "album" on my profile page ...
    oh, and for actual color images?
    i plan on using a modern device, which is not very modern at the moment ...
     
  6. flatulent1

    flatulent1 Subscriber

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    I shoot about 70% B&W, 30% color. About 5% of that is transparency film. Currently 90% 35mm and 10% 120; I do not shoot LF. I process my own B&W, send out my color for process and scan. I have no scanner or printer at home. I have lately been looking at doing my own color processing, or perhaps just the E6, as it seems like everyone I go to sends their E6 to Dwaynes.

    At the current rate of disappearance I don't see color materials being available ten years from now, or priced so extravagantly as to put it out of reach of the hobbyist, so I am more focused on the B&W side of things; as I intend to build a darkroom in the next five years, it will be a B&W darkroom. Any investment in color process, I am thinking, will be money flushed down the toilet. I wish it were otherwise, and will be delighted to be proved wrong.
     
  7. jerrybro

    jerrybro Subscriber

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    E-6? I've given it up. Didn't want to, but with the death of Ektachrome I decided it was time. I've played recently with Ektar and Portra and the results seem promising. I'm going to try my hand at RA4 printing some of the tons of negatives I have, if that goes well then I might do some Ektar or Portra and C-41 at home on the Jobo. If the printing doesn't go well then I'll stick with black and white.
     
  8. jm94

    jm94 Member

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    I use E-6 at home for my super-8 processing, E-6 is a piece of cake at home, even by using a water bath to maintain temperature. I use the Tetenal 3-Bath kit for E-6 and Tetenal C41. I use kodak ektar film as my primary colour film, superb! C41, like E6 is a piece of cake, easier than B&W in fact.
    Its just maintaining temperatures, failures here can be catastrophic, but keep to it, and it is easy. I plan to home process all my super-8 so as long as i can shoot colour super-8, i will use E-6. likewise for C41. I do alot of B&W shooting, developing and printing, all depends on my mood at the time for what I am shooting. I use many B&W films favouring Rollei RPX, Kodak TMAX and ilford's range (Delta 100, 3200, FP4), XP2 Super I use when i know I will need to shoot under a wide range of conditions for a given session, and the C-41 processing for XP2 makes it a piece of cake.

    Jacob
     
  9. BradleyK

    BradleyK Subscriber

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    E6? I was fortunate enough to be able to pick up several hundred rolls of Ektachrome E100G and VS (both in 35mm and 120 formats) over the course of the last several months (perhaps 700 rolls total?). At current rates, this stash should last me 18-14 months. Thereafter, I am not certain whether I will start shooting Provia/Velvia or just give up on colour work. To date, I have been sending my E6 to Dwayne's; I have a batch (60 rolls?) that I will have processed locally (ABC Color) to see how well the locals do.
     
  10. DREW WILEY

    DREW WILEY Member

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    Well it's pretty damn premature to be stampeded into panic for me. E6 and C41 developing are readily available in this area for any format film, so I feel no need to add yet another chore to my darkroom work. I have enough sheet film in the freezer for about a decade of serious work, and far
    more old shots than I'll ever have time to print. But if either of these types of chemisty falls out of
    favor commercially some day, don't expect mere hobby amounts to stay in production for long either.
    Still, it's the horse I'm betting on. Most latest and greatest digital gear will probably be obsolete and
    unservicable first, and need to be repurchased on a frequent basis. And I just don't like the look of
    inkjets, at least for my own images.
     
  11. wogster

    wogster Member

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    Use them when I feel the need while we still have them, stop when we don't.....
     
  12. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    Bradley:

    ABC isn't currently doing E6. They are having Customcolour do it for them.

    They tell me though that if volumes warrant it they will consider re-instituting the service. Maybe your 60 rolls will tilt the balance.
     
  13. darkroom_rookie

    darkroom_rookie Member

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    The plan: shoot all 17 boxes of Provia 4x5 film I have and hand-develop it in 3010 drum with two Fuji Hunt E-6 kits in my freezer. After that comes sticking them on an acrylic cylinder in a certain Danish-made electronic device, but that's perhaps a bit OT...
     
  14. EASmithV

    EASmithV Member

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    you know color chemistry is really easy... I've been doing E6 in a plastic dishtub with holes poked in it to keep the water level constant and controlling the temp with the sink

    I taco dev 4x5 c41 and e6 in my paterson tanks.

    And my quality control was much higher than the local "pro" lab, even after i intentionally threw the temps off 5 degrees to see what difference they made. Still came out beautiful.

    The most expensive part of my E6 processor was the Weston thermometer.
     
  15. Diapositivo

    Diapositivo Subscriber

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    There always is an alternative:

    http://www.filmscanner.info/en/ReflectaProScan7200.html

    I read somewhere of some new scanners (real scanners) soon to enter production but my memory fails at the moment.

    When and if my Nikon Coolscan 5000 dies (scratching...) I'll buy a second-hand Minolta Dimage "Pro" scanner, able to scan 120, which will in turn open a new round of GAS involving Rolleiflexes, Hasselblads and various folders. Hope it will be later rather than sooner :smile:
     
  16. Diapositivo

    Diapositivo Subscriber

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    Scheimfluger (Scheimpfluger, I suppose?) I suggest going "one-shot" without hesitations.

    One-shot is not one-shot. You do two passes* on the same chemistry as far as the first three baths are concerned, and bleach and fix can easily do more than that. Final rinse / stabilizer even more than the latter.
    You never have to deal with exhausted chemistry, correcting acidity or whatever. Your chemistry is always fresh, always of constant quality, with reliable and repeatable results;
    The chemistry is much more easily preserved in its concentrated form (just use proper flasks and some propane/butane gas).

    It doesn't cost more than replenishing. My 50 Euros kit does 50 rolls. Rotative developing uses a small volume of diluted chemistry.

    It is easier as you only have the 6 canonical baths (plus the "final rinse / stabilizer) you don't have to fiddle with starter and replenisher and you don't have to worry about potency, freshness, doing tests etc.

    People not using rotative processing have to prepare higher volumes of chemistry and that maybe shifts the convenience to replenishing. Rotative processing lends itself very well to one-shot processing without any cost aggravation.

    * Two passes without letting the chemistry degrade, let's say within 24 hours, guarantee a level of quality which is at least on par with what you get from professional laboratories. Some people uses the same one-shot chemistry for three or more passes. That might cause some minimal decay in image quality. Two passes give you the very best quality your film can give.
     
  17. Diapositivo

    Diapositivo Subscriber

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    My plans for the foreseeable future are as follows:

    I will certainly go on using slides;
    I am considering adding colour negatives. I still have to make the first developments (my kit is still sealed). I have some 10 or 15 colour negative rolls to develop and examine.
    I am attracted to negative film for the greater exposure latitude, and as a ready back-up in case slide film becomes too expensive.
    I am deterred from negative film by the filtering issues and the scanning issues (noise in the highlights).

    I plan making "film profiles" of each negative film before scanning. That requires shopping for a slide duplicator which I should do this winter. Until then my considerations regarding long-term use of negative films will be withheld.

    I suppose in any case that slide film will remain my preferred medium and that negative film will be confined mostly to high-brightness-range situations.
     
  18. scheimfluger_77

    scheimfluger_77 Subscriber

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    Fabrizio (and everyone else),

    Thank's for all the great feedback. I've decided to keep the Jobo and use it for my black and white work to begin with. If a low volume commercial opportunity presents itself I'll be ready. In the meantime the only dark I'll need is the 1/2 bath by the garage. Fabrizio you are correct about the "p" in Scheimpfluger. I misspelled it when setting up on the pinhole forum, oh well.

    Steve