What chemicals do I use to develop SFX 200?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by imageWIS., Sep 27, 2007.

  1. imageWIS.

    imageWIS. Member

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    I was thinking of using infrared and trying it out, since it is an option we have in our Experimental Photography class. Can I just use Kodak developer to develop SFX 200 film, or do I need some other kind of developer / chemicals?

    Or should I get Rollei Infrared 400/27 or Kodak HIE Infrared Film instead? If so will the results be better? How do I develop true infrared film (i.e. what chemicals?) or should I send it to a lab?

    Thanks!

    Jon.
     
  2. simulatordan

    simulatordan Member

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    Hello Jon,

    I use Ilford ID11 @ 1:1. I understand ID11 is the same as Kodak D76. I'm sure you will be given other alternatives too.

    Regards Daniel
     
  3. fschifano

    fschifano Member

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    I've used ID-11 and D-76 (they are the same) on SFX, and it works fine. I'm not terribly crazy about the film though. It yields only a moderate IR effect when used with a red #25 filter. I have not tried it with a stronger filter, so I'm probably missing something.
     
  4. keithwms

    keithwms Member

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    See http://www.digitaltruth.com/devchart.html for processing options.

    My personal vote would be for Rollei IR; just by picking your filter, you can get very mild effects such as with sfx, or stronger effects more akin to HIE (except without the strong halation).

    The main point when developing IR films is that they are sensitive to light you cannot see, so you need to redouble your efforts to avoid stray light. Safelights are out of the question.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 27, 2007
  5. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

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    Unlike Kodak HIE, SFX does need a stronger filter to get the classic IR effect.


    Steve.
     
  6. Neal

    Neal Subscriber

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  7. Gary Holliday

    Gary Holliday Member

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    In your position, I would start with the Ilford SFX and a suitable SFX filter (Ilford sell one). True infra red films, are more sensitive to IR light, but require practice to get accurate exposures. They also need to be handled in complete darkness including loading the film into the camera.

    If it's for a project you may not have time to do all the tests, so Ilford SFX or Rollei IR 400 and an 89B/ RG695/ R72/ 092/ or SFX filter.
     
  8. DaveOttawa

    DaveOttawa Subscriber

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    HIE may be easier to get attractive "experimental" results from, it will give a distinct IR look even with an orange filter, red would be preferred (there are a couple of shots at my APUG gallery). If you go that way here's my personal HIE checklist, it may help:

    Infra Red Photography Check List
    o Refrigerate or freeze film until ready to use - but allow enough time to warm up before loading. Use the freshest film you can.
    o Open canister and load and unload film only in complete darkness (darkroom or daylight changing bag).
    o Expose with red filter. Orange will often work nearly as well.
    o Use small apertures (f/8 or smaller) for good depth of field and to avoid problems with IR focus shift.
    o Bracket around 1/125 at f/11 in bright or hazy sunlight. (Up to five stops, i.e. 1/30, 1/60, 1/125, 1/250 & 1/500 seconds at f/11) for the first roll to explore effexts of exposure on the IR look.
    o Or bracket around ISO 50 with incident meter or ISO 400 with TTL meter and red filter.
    o Take notes to record exposure and lighting conditions for each frame at least for the first trial roll.
    o A good starting point for film developing is D-76 (straight not 1:1) for 8.5 minutes at 68°F/20°C). Reduce time by 15% for the next roll if highlights are too dense for your taste.
    o Printing may need longer times (dense negatives) and shadows may need to be held back to show detail.

    Post some images whichever way you go!
     
  9. jim appleyard

    jim appleyard Member

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    I like to use either D-76 1+0 to give a "fine grain" look to this film or Rodinal to bring out the grain. Bear in mind that this is a grainy film to begin with and D-76 and Rodinal are two very different devs.

    You can find times for SFX here:http://www.digitaltruth.com/devchart.html

    If you don't use an IR filter, this film behave pretty much like an ordinary 200 speed film.
     
  10. Lee Shively

    Lee Shively Member

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    To get a true IR effect from this film, you need both proper filtration and light with a lot of infrared. Sunny weather in the spring with lots of new vegetation is prime IR time. I've used it with a Hoya R72 and gotten very nice results. It also can be used as a standard film when no filter is used. It has a different look but it's kinda grainy.

    I haven't used any in several years--still have a few rolls in the freezer, though. I processed it in D76 1:1.