What do I need to Process B&W Film.

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Morgan ~ MOD54, Mar 27, 2013.

  1. Morgan ~ MOD54

    Morgan ~ MOD54 Partner Partner

    Messages:
    18
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2012
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    I made this a while ago, but might be useful to anyone wanting to get back into processing film. The basic kit needed.

    [video=youtube_share;W3n3MdmoezM]http://youtu.be/W3n3MdmoezM[/video]
     
  2. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

    Messages:
    4,708
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2010
    Shooter:
    35mm RF
    Morgan, great film, but can I suggest a different method on a few things you mention. First of all never ever use a squeegee (ever). Also you don't need a bottle opener or cassette opener, because if you listen and feel when you rewind the film, you can stop to leave a bit of film out of the cassette. You can then cut the leader to load about 6" of film that you wasted when loading the camera and load this on the spiral in daylight. Also colour coding the chemicals helps in identification.
     
  3. pstake

    pstake Member

    Messages:
    715
    Joined:
    May 5, 2005
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Had a friend asking me just today how she could get set up to process film at home. And here's this video.

    Thanks, Morgan — i've just emailed her a link to your video.

    Everybody finds his/her way but this is an excellent starter.
     
  4. dreamingartemis

    dreamingartemis Member

    Messages:
    279
    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2009
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Is there any particular reason to not use a squeegee? I've been using one as opposed to my 2 fingers method and so far it's much better and less smelly fingers on my hand. :laugh::laugh:
     
  5. polyglot

    polyglot Member

    Messages:
    3,472
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2009
    Location:
    South Austra
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Oh geez, not the squeegee fight again!

    Look, most films now (anything from Kodak, Fuji or Ilford) are very well-hardened and can be squeegeed fearlessly unless there's grit present. Some of the other brands (Foma in particular) run a real risk of getting scratched by squeegeeing. Doesn't mean you can't do it, just means the risks are higher and you must be gentler.

    And whether a squeegee is beneficial or not to your film drying with/without spots, that all depends on your water hardness and how much photoflo you put in the final rinse. Some combinations work better with a squeegee, some work better without. Everyone of course thinks that what they do is best and that all other approaches are wrong.

    More getting-started-with-B&W instructions in my FAQ linked below...
     
  6. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

    Messages:
    6,930
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2007
    Location:
    Richmond VA.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I like the video.

    Jeff
     
  7. AgX

    AgX Member

    Messages:
    11,911
    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2007
    Location:
    Germany
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    This only applies on cameras without motorized film rewind.
     
  8. bobwysiwyg

    bobwysiwyg Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,623
    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2008
    Location:
    Ann Arbor, M
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Yup.
     
  9. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

    Messages:
    4,708
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2010
    Shooter:
    35mm RF
    No it doesn't, because in that case you can use a leader extractor. Ref sqeegee, have seen to many films with tram lines down the whole length from grit on the rubber.
     
  10. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

    Messages:
    16,807
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2005
    Location:
    Delta, BC, Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Or for those that provide for the option, set the motorized rewind to leave the leader extended after rewind.

    Just be sure to carefully mark or segregate the exposed film, so you don't re-expose it by mistake :whistling:
     
  11. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

    Messages:
    6,542
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2010
    Location:
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Some people squeegee and some don't. Fine. But if one is trying to teach a beginner how to get good results with the least number of potential complications/problems, I have to question the recommendation to squeegee or wipe the wet film in any way. Proper use of a wetting agent substantially reduces drying spots. Using distilled water with a wetting agent eliminates drying spots. If either of those methods are used, a squeegee adds no value and only introduces more risk. One should generally not assume incremental risk when there is no potential reward.