what exactly happens if you don't refrigerate?

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by srmcnamara, Apr 27, 2008.

  1. srmcnamara

    srmcnamara Member

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    So last summer I went to Yellowstone and decided that in addition to my digital rebel (pleasedon'tshootme) and normal black and white work I would shoot some color slide film for the first time. I did and got some neat images as well as some not as neat images of course but with the hassle of sending them out for processing and having to scan them on a crummy flatbed scanner I sort of got frustrated and never bothered to put the remaining film in the fridge. Currently I'm having a glance at those slides and I'm really liking what I see.
    My question is what happens to the stuff when it sits on one's desk for 9 months? (fuji velvia 100 and provia 400). Also, who wants to buy me a big boy scanner?:tongue:
     
  2. David William White

    David William White Member

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    Probably not much, provided it's still within (or close to) the expiry date. Now, if it was left in your glove compartment or something....

    My experience with out of date slide film is that extended exposure to heat makes it come out cyan-heavy.
     
  3. srmcnamara

    srmcnamara Member

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    they were kept in non-air conditioned cabins and in my pack on hikes for those two weeks I was in the parks and I think the stuff I've got back was a bit blue for my liking but if I understand you correctly then there shouldn't be anything further?


    I guess the way to find out would be to shoot some rolls.
     
  4. David William White

    David William White Member

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    When you say 'a bit blue', is that how the scans came out, or how they look on a light table, or how they look when projected? Scanners and light tables are good approximations, but not identical to projector bulbs.
     
  5. marsbars

    marsbars Member

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    A bit blue can also come from the color cast of open shade on a sunny day. I have that problem when I am shooting in the forest on a sunny day. Darn skylight. :smile:
     
  6. fschifano

    fschifano Member

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    A bit blue is how it can look when shot at high altitudes too. Thinner air = less blue light scatter and more UV.
     
  7. srmcnamara

    srmcnamara Member

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    hmm, I guess they are blue in the scans, I haven't looked at them on a light table (I'm just using my computer screen) since I picked them up and I don't remember how they projected.



    both the blue sky deal and the high altitudes would probably be applicable here as well (although I have some cloudy pics that are blue too.)



    thanks everyone. I guess it won't hurt to shoot a roll or two to see what happens.
     

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  8. PVia

    PVia Member

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    Provia can be very blue, even in bright sunlight.

    A warming filter helps a lot if you need to get it right on the tranny...